Congressional Grandstanding?

Daniel J. Ikenson says yes:

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nevada, said he was “so upset … they should take all the uniforms, put them in a big pile and burn them and start all over again.” House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, clucked of the Olympic committee at a news conference that “You’d think they’d know better.”
To prevent such abominations in the future, six Democratic senators plan to introduce the “Team USA Made in America Act of 2012″ next week. According to co-sponsor Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-New York, the legislation will mandate that “(f)rom head to toe, Team U.S.A. must be made in America.” (The U.S. Olympic Committee announced Friday that it was too late to remake the uniforms for the London Games, but said the U.S. clothing for the 2014 Winter Games would be made in the U.S.)…

In the typical production supply chain for consumer products, of which apparel production is a good example, the higher-value, pre-manufacturing activities like designing, engineering, and branding, and post-manufacturing activities like marketing, warehousing, transporting, and retailing happen in the United States, while the mostly lower-end manufacturing and assembly activities take place abroad. In the end, the final product is a collaborative effort, with the majority of the value accruing to U.S. workers, firms, and shareholders.
So, what exactly is un-American about Chinese-made Olympic uniforms? Nearly half of the clothing in America’s closets is made in China, and almost all of the rest is made in other foreign countries. With a very few exceptions, we simply don’t cut and sew clothing much in the United States anymore.
But we design clothing here. We brand clothing here. We market and retail clothing here.
The apparel industry employs plenty of Americans, just not in the cutting and sewing operations that our parents and grandparents endured, working long hours for low wages….
Besides, the implication that producing several hundred uniforms in the United States would fix the national employment problem is humorous. Maybe it would have created a few dozen jobs for perhaps a few weeks, but not much more than that. Far more jobs would be created from the one extra day of certainty that would be afforded by Congress deciding today, as opposed to tomorrow, what the 2013 tax rates were going to be.
If you are still not convinced of the folly of our policymakers’ objections, consider this: As our U.S. athletes march around the track at London’s Olympic stadium wearing their Chinese-made uniforms and waving their Chinese-made American flags, there is a good chance that Chinese athletes will have arrived in London by U.S.-made aircraft, been trained on U.S.-designed and -engineered equipment, wearing U.S.-designed and -engineered footwear, many having perfected their skills using U.S.-created technology.
Our economic relationship with China, characterized by transnational supply chains and disaggregated production sharing, is more collaborative than competitive.
The nature of that relationship is inherently beneficial to American consumers and the economy at large; despite the alarmism emanating from the halls of power, trade is not a win-lose proposition. Politicians should butt out and let the “competition” play out in the pools, tracks and playing fields.

About Scot McKnight

Scot McKnight is a recognized authority on the New Testament, early Christianity, and the historical Jesus. McKnight, author of more than forty books, is the Professor of New Testament at Northern Seminary in Lombard, IL.

  • http://bookwi.se Adam Shields

    It is humorous to me that as far as I have heard, no one is complaining about the price, just about location. After all most of us probably have one or two items of clothing that cost $2000 a piece.

  • Tim

    Oh give me a break. Politics at its most absurd, bending over backwards to find any advantage in one upping one another in pandering to populist sentiments.

  • Jamieson

    I wonder if the athletes will care where the medals are minted.

  • Ed

    The main problem I have with clothing (and other products) made in China (or some other countries) is the probability that it was made by slaves.

  • Dan

    Grandstanding? From our politicians? And in an election year?

    Now here’s some serious Christian reflection on the politics of the day. At least we don’t have to talk about the economy, or peace in the Middle East, or Eric Holder & Operation Fast and Furious, or Chicago gang violence, etc.

  • James Neely

    In this matter of a ‘manufacturing’ economy vs. a ‘service’ economy, I remember a comment I heard many years ago: “If we keep moving from a manufacturing based economy to a service based economy, pretty soon we will be earning our living by washing each other’s clothes”.

  • Mark

    I don’t have a piece of clothing that cost $200, let alone $2,000.

  • phil_style

    I bet them politicians are happily wearing Italian suits, Swiss watches and spraying themselves with French cologne.

  • PJ Anderson

    I’m shocked! Absolutely shocked to find out politicians would use such a moment for their own agendas! I’m just shocked!


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