To Disrupt Us

Ed goes to the heart of it:

Avoiding the hard passages of the Bible altered my understanding of God and didn’t prepare me for the complications of life.

If all we have is an easily understood, easily explained, neat and tidy Bible, then it’s not much good in a world that is confusing, mysterious, and extremely messed up.

I’m less and less convinced that the Bible exists to give us straight answers. If that was the purpose of the Bible, then it does a bad job of it.

Rather, the Bible comforts, questions, and disrupts us. We can see that our troubles today are nothing new and that people have been seeking out God for thousands of years, asking questions, making requests, and finding hope in the presence of God.

About Scot McKnight

Scot McKnight is a recognized authority on the New Testament, early Christianity, and the historical Jesus. McKnight, author of more than forty books, is the Professor of New Testament at Northern Seminary in Lombard, IL.

  • Clay Knick

    This was really good.

  • Alan

    Thank you. In the last couple of months I’ve had so many people tall me that the Bible is an ‘instruction manual.’ I’ve wanted to say why that attitude falls so far short but haven’t been able to articulate it well. This nailed it!

  • Steve Robinson

    Yep, the longer I live the less the “instruction manual” paradigm makes any sense to me simply because I don’t know how to even do what the instructions tell me to do even when they seem clear. I find the “map” idea to be more helpful: it has labels and general markers to get to a place, but to find the real people and relationships you need to interact, not with the map itself, but with the “locals” to find out how to live in a particular place and how to “be a native”.

  • pastordt

    AMEN. Thank you.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X