US Foods Banned Elsewhere

From Paleoista:

Wake Up Call News, an Alternative Media site that “shares all the big top news from the whole world” and whose mission is to “share The Truth and Wake people Up” had an alarming article about foods that are available to us here in the US but are banned elsewhere.   Citing mercola.com as their source, we see the following horrifying ‘foods’ that are in every day foods, despite being seen as harmful to toxic in other countries.

Often,when I reference another article, I do my best to edit down to highlight the most significant parts.  It was hard to do so with this piece as I felt nearly all the information provided with each was quite crucial….

From their site:

#1: FARM-RAISED SALMON   

#2: GENETICALLY ENGINEERED PAPAYA 

#3: RACTOPAMINE-TAINTED MEAT

 #4: FLAME RETARDANT DRINKS

#5: PROCESSED FOODS CONTAINING ARTIFICIAL FOOD COLORS AND DYES

#6: ARSENIC-LACED CHICKEN

#7: BREAD WITH POTASSIUM BROMATE

#8: OLESTRA/OLEAN

#9 BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) and BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene)  

#10: MILK AND DAIRY PRODUCTS LACED WITH RBGH

To me, the most appalling thing is not what these things do to us in terms of poisoning, but that they’re all OK by the FDA.  So what does that tell you about everything else they approve, including prescription drugs?  And how about the ‘approved’ advice that can be doled out in terms of what we should be eating?

Think about where the information is coming from and who benefits and try to adopt the attitude that ‘approved by the FDA’ really doesn’t mean anything in terms of whether something is good for us or might actually make us sick.

Yet one more reason to go Paleo and steer clear from any ‘food’ that is packaged or processed.  Go straight to the source and be confident that you’re procuring clean, safe food for yourself and your family.  Support your local farmers and ranchers who you can get to know on a personal level and develop a trust that their food is actually, truly food.

About Scot McKnight

Scot McKnight is a recognized authority on the New Testament, early Christianity, and the historical Jesus. McKnight, author of more than fifty books, is the Professor of New Testament at Northern Seminary in Lombard, IL.

  • Phil Miller

    Whenever I see an article about railing about the dangers of certain things and their main reason for doing is “chemicals”, I pretty much write them off as a hack. It’s true that in large amounts the things listed above can be dangerous, but that’s how toxicity works. It’s all about the dosage. It’s just interesting given everything else discussed here on this site regarding science. I find article like this their own kind of pseudoscience or even anti-scientific in a way.

  • Dre

    Thanks for sharing this. I ended up in the hospital this year due to sensitivities to several of the things on this list. Namely food dyes, and BHT/BHA.

    During the height of my sickness I was only eating Rice Chex, and drinking Gatorade because I thought “I need to eat as bland as possible” and “I need my electrolytes.” Beyond that I was being prescribed medication after medication to treat my symptoms instead of finding the root of the problem. I finally told my 3rd doctor and 2nd specialist after numerous tests, and talk of cancer, and Crohn’s disease that I was going to look elsewhere for help.

    Taking a more natural approach and determining my sensitivities, my body was able to recover in a month or so. I have great respect for our medical doctors but was disappointed that I went through so many costly and scary tests when it was as simple as my diet.

    Seems so obvious that all of these unnatural additives we ingest are going to have an impact beyond what we see today. Love articles like this, because they remind us to think. To think about how we fuel our bodies. To think for ourselves instead of taking an administration’s word for it.

    Treat yourself well.

    Thanks for the reminder Scott.

  • Emily

    Thanks for this article, and the reminder that what we eat matters. One of the great things about this blog is the variety of articles you post.

  • Preston Garrison

    “It’s just interesting given everything else discussed here on this site regarding science.”

    Exactly. On the one hand tell people to respect science regarding evolution and on the other promote alt. med. superstition from a quack like Mercola. What gives?

  • Dan

    So the idea is to go local, be an individual, take responsibility for your own diet, don’t trust the big federal bureaucracy…

    …how about healthcare?

    …how about education?

    …etc.

  • Paul Roberts

    We’re well aware of this in the European Union, and the point you make is a good one. The other thing we notice, whenever we come to the USA, is how the beef doesn’t have the same strength of taste as in Europe. I can only guess the reason is that most US beef cattle are grain-fed, rather than grass-fed, but I’m open to correction.

  • http://jamesdowden.wordpress.com/ James Dowden

    Never mind. You’re safe from the lethal Kinder Egg… ;-)

  • truthisfree4u

    Much of it is like the still-wrong histeria over DDT, which scientists are now showing was never the threat it was made out to be by Carson’s bad science. Truth is, more have died from its ban than the dooms-dayers claimed would die (but didn’t) from its use.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aSYla0y9Wcs

  • Susan_G1

    This post has gotten me thinking about a number of things today, as I wonder if there is some spiritual aspect to our love of ‘the incompletely correct’. Our food and water supply has never been safer, yet the fluoride conspiracy is almost as old as I am. What do we really believe about a “paleolithic” diet and, more importantly, why? Only hundred years ago, people in the US died of cholera; many people died of raw-milk acquired TB. Until recently, cochineal was a great source of natural food coloring. It’s derived from a beetle. Now there is a move to outlaw it. Why do we believe, or want to believe, in ‘bad science’? Why do we like conspiracy theories? I am interested to know, Scot, if you have given this any thought, as a theologian. Is there a ‘conspiracy-shaped vacuum’ in our hearts? I wonder if it’s some sort of idolatry, a search for false truth, a thing akin to gossip on a national level. If it is a way to make predictable an unpredictable world. It is an interesting subject.

    For those of your readers who do trust science done well, it’s a bit of a dilemma to read a post like this. For those of us concerned with overfishing and our impact on the world, do we want to fish salmon to extinction? Do we really understand the level of safety of wild fish anymore?

    I think, spiritually, there’s more to this than meets the eye. More that just “good health”. It had led to a couple hours of reading better studies on why people enjoy distrust of things.

  • http://www.fivedills.com Greg Dill

    Living in a foreign country that has it’s own share of problematic foods and hygiene, I have come to the conclusion that Americans are germaphobes. “Going to straight to the source” is not guaranteed to be any safer. Even non-processed foods contain some elements of toxins from chemicals used to stave off bugs and insects. The bottom line is that we are all going to die of something, whether it’s from pollutants in the air, toxins in our food, germs from public places, etc. This is why God created our body’s immune system to adapt and fight when needed. Don’t worry. Be happy.

  • Brandon Smith

    I don’t think there is anything pseudo-scientific about not eating just a little bit of poison. That’s a bit like saying, I’ll only eat a small bit of poo. The fact is, I can travel from the Atlantic to the Pacific and enter into a grocery store that will have the same foods. I no longer believe you could feed an entire nation with rapidly declining farm agricultural sectors without crafting non food as food. Its just plain common sense that we should be eating real foods and dodging the other, even if it tastes different or seems to be associated with some quackery like Paleo.

  • JoshMann

    Paul, I had to smile about the beef description. My wife and I are from the U.S., living in Edinburgh, and we so miss the taste of good corn-fed beef! (Many in our families raise cattle, so we have had also had the privilege of knowing where and how our beef was raised).

  • BryanJensen

    There’s no reason that “going Paleo” has to be the only response, unless by “Paleo” you instead mean whole foods and not necessarily lots of meat. ;-)

  • Paul Roberts

    I guess the rule goes: home food is best!! :-)

  • Susan_G1

    Even eschewing processed foods, you will certainly eat an amount of ‘poo’ nearly every day. You will eat maggots, thrips, insect fragments, “foreign matter”, mold, rodent hairs, and insect and mammalian feces. But you will eat less of them now than ever before.

    There is no such thing as “pure” food. All food is contaminated. My family shoots and eats venison. We accept that there will be the occasional deer hair in the meat, and contaminants we don’t see. If you grow your own food, as we did, and use natural fertilizer (we used our goats’ and chicken manure), then you are eating e. coli, salmonella, etc. Natural food contains natural toxins and carcinogens. If you grill meat, you will be eating a large dose of a co-carcinogen (one I used to study, and, yes, I grill meat) with every helping. If you live in a less industrialized society, you will be exposed to much worse.

    As someone who used to do cancer research, and now practices medicine, I offer this tidbit: God knew the future of the world when He made us, and equipped us with wondrous bodies that can deal with a great variety of insults every day. Cancer has been found in mummies of Egypt. It is in our fallen genes. We cannot evade our physical end. I believe if we lived to help others, we would be less concerned with our own exposures to a fallen Nature.

  • Randy Gabrielse

    Dan,
    You sound almost like Rod Dreher’s “Crunchy Cons: How Birkenstocked Burkeans, gun loving organic gardeners, evangelical free-range farmers, hip home-schooling mamas, right wing nature lovers, and their diverse tribe of countercultural conservatives plan to save America (or at least the Republican Party).

  • Dan

    Just noting that most of my acquaintances on the left trust the government implicitly, except when they don’t, as in this case related to food additives. Me, I just believe in the fall and distrust too much power in the hands of too few.


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