Where Are You on This Infographic?

Religion Cheat Sheet
Source: ChristianUniversitesOnline.org

About Scot McKnight

Scot McKnight is a recognized authority on the New Testament, early Christianity, and the historical Jesus. McKnight, author of more than forty books, is the Professor of New Testament at Northern Seminary in Lombard, IL.

  • Geoff

    According to this Jehovah’s Witnesses believe in the Trinity.

  • William Donahue

    … And unitarians are polytheistic. I appreciate these kinds of graphs, but the “Christian Universities Online” organization didn’t do a very good job here.

  • Anneke Garcia

    Nice attempt, but in order to get to “Mormon” (which I am) I would have had to say I believe that the Bible alone is the highest authority on Christian matters (which we don’t) and that polygamy is permissable (which we also don’t believe.)

  • Paul Fischer

    This is pretty flawed. Not all Presbyterians are against women’s ordination and Lutherans would definitely answer yes every time for the bible as their source of authority.

  • http://following-not-dreaming.blogspot.com/ Blake

    The flow chart is pretty awful in it’s inaccuracies. However, how many correct ones can people find? Southern Baptist is accurate.

  • Jenna

    This is terrible. So reductionist. So many assumptions. Not even worth listing them all. Part of me thinks this chart isn’t worth engaging, but it does highlight a lot of the questions that we consider “core”–or that have actually divided people into faith groups. Most of them shouldn’t be important enough to define us, but I know I use these categories too often.

  • Steve_Winnipeg_Canada

    Awful and inaccurate. Lots of fun, though. Says I’m Pentecostal.

  • scotmcknight

    Yes, reductionistic but it shows how simple categories can’t get a person to their orientation.

  • Mark Kennedy

    As others have said, lots of logical fallacies (especially false dilemmas–two choices when there could have been 9, or 26), but still fun. It pegged me as a Methodist. Close enough, I guess.

  • J. Vega

    Definitely humorous, but the one that jumped out at me was no category for Messianic Judaism (which I am not, but I’m getting to know a fair number of people who fall into this category and their voice seems to be frequently ignored). The reincarnation thing for traditional Judaism came as a surprise. Wasn’t aware of that.

  • Marshall

    If you (like me) believe in One Creator God, there is no category. Also, there’s no way to get to believing in the Trinity. And if you believe you are a divine being, there is a label without explanation. Probably typos, but deep, very deep.

  • http://ryanrobinson.ca/ Ryan Robinson

    Yeah, in reality I best line up with Mennonites, but I got EPO. Mennonites don’t strictly say that the Bible ALONE is the highest authority, not in the same way as mainstream Protestants (Lutheran and Reformed traditions) at least. And the vast majority of Mennonites I have encountered ordain women. And lastly, as an Anabaptist I got annoyed that I got asked about my political affiliation without an option for God’s Kingdom is not of this world.

  • BradK

    This assumes all Southern Baptists are uniform in beliefs. But they are not. For example, I am Southern Baptist and believe ordination of women is biblical. I have a fellow church member who is a Christian pacifist. He is also Southern Baptist. Neither of us utterly rejects the validity of a Christian today speaking in tongues. And I’m not even sure what “are you more into a philosophy than a religion” means. If you asked random Southern Baptists that question, 99% would just give you a funny look. :-) Maybe if they replaced “philosophy” with “relationship” it would be more accurate for Southern Baptists. But plenty of Southern Baptists do not reject the term religion as a description of our faith. Jesus brother, James, talks about “pure religion and undefiled” and he was Southern Baptist, right? ;-)


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