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Most Thorough Review of My Book

In honor of flying out early in the morning to speak in the United Kingdom for the next 10 days, here is a link to the most thorough review of my book I’ve ever seen … it’s almost as long as my book itself!  :)

The review was published in one of the UK’s most prominent Christian publications, Fulcrum, done by Anglican Reverend Andrew Goddard, the foremost Christian ethicist in England. His review caught quite a few headlines throughout the UK, and also sparked some intriguing conversations on UK GLBT sites as well. In fact, while I’m out there I will be meeting with the founder’s of the two most well known religious GLBT organizations, Courage and Changing Attitudes, as well as with council members and key leaders from the Evangelical Alliance, the Diocese of London, the Salvation Army and pastors and professors from various churches and seminaries throughout England and Scotland.

From all of my correspondence thus far with each community in the UK, I can honestly say there is an intriguing, yet cautious hunger, to see their culture war end as well. Pray with me that in meeting with the various leaders that this trip will help spark a unique dialogue throughout the United Kingdom in ways that none of us know.

I will continue blogging throughout my trip as much as I can to keep everyone updated!

We’re doing this thing!

Much love.

www.themarinfoundation.org

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About Andrew Marin

Andrew Marin is President and Founder of The Marin Foundation (www.themarinfoundation.org). He is author of the award winning book Love Is an Orientation (2009), its interactive DVD curriculum (2011), and recently an academic ebook titled Our Last Option: How a New Approach to Civility can Save the Public Square (2013). Andrew is a regular contributor to a variety of media outlets and frequently lectures at universities around the world. Since 2010 Andrew has been asked by the United Nations to advise their various agencies on issues of bridging opposing worldviews, civic engagement, and theological aspects of reconciliation. For twelve years he lived in the LGBT Boystown neighborhood of Chicago, and is currently based St. Andrews, Scotland, where he is teaching and researching at the University of St. Andrews earning his PhD in Constructive Theology with a focus on the Theology of Culture. Andrew's research centers on the cultural, political, and religious dynamics of reconciliation. Andrew is married to Brenda, and you can find him elsewhere on Twitter (@Andrew_Marin), Facebook (AndrewMarin01), and Instagram (@andrewmarin1).

  • http://theformers.wordpress.com Debbie Thurman

    Wow! On a grand scale. Goddard has accomplished with this review what ought to humble everyone else who has read your book — which needs to be reread and reread, of course.

    Andrew, as I’ve said before, you have challenged me to the core with your “mission” and call-out to all Christians. It needed to happen. God moves on us, layer by layer, as we examine and begin to shed old paradigms. I have been up and down on all this over the past few months, and I want to humbly acknowledge that here before God and everybody. But in my heart of hearts, I know “meeting” you has been one of the most important divine appointments of my life.

    “All of us are held hostage by our axiomatic beliefs. We are jailbirds incarcerated within the fortress of dogma and precedent. And yet, for the most part, we are oblivious to our own captivity.” (“The Future of Management” by Gary Hamel)

    That nugget was the crux of what could have been a much stronger presentation in yesterday’s Webinar I referred to earlier. How does the Church remain salty and true to its mission in taking the redeeming truth of the Gospel to lost and hurting souls, including the gay community, while repenting of our own sin of condemning our gay brothers and sisters with cries of “Racca!” and casting them as the ultimate enemy? How do we do this without becoming insipid and creating the incorrect impression that we are conforming to the world? That’s what we wrestle with before God.

    Something far bigger than any of us is happening here. It is an opportunity. Will we blow it or see it through?

    Can you appreciate the place I am coming from, having fought the internal, infernal battle that brought me beyond acquiescing to my rebellious desires to “walk on the gay side”? You have friends who came out to you as gay. I presume they still are. Do you also have friends like me who went the other way? I have to believe so.

    It seems to me God means to use us both in a new way. I, too, have been drawn into conversations with Christian or spiritually hungry gays because a part of me can connect with them as an insider. I think many “ex-gays” are afraid to go there. I cannot just go away sad after these conversations — frustrating as they can be — believing them to be lost and unredeemable. I see them as prodigals, waiting for a symbolic father to run to them with open arms. I realize that there but for the grace of God go I. I cannot affirm everything about them, but I can love them, and I do.

    But I also am aware that many other prodigals who are fearful and ignorant of pulling back the curtain and examining homosexuality also exist in the body of Christ. Many do damage without even realizing it.

    Like Goddard said in his review, I don’t have this all connected yet. But I am willing to submit myself to God for Him to complete that work.

    I will be praying for your meetings in England. Monumental stuff. Apologies for the long comments recently.

  • Mrs T

    Can you give us an itinerary of your trip so we can pray more intelligently?
    It sounds so exciting!

  • willi stewart

    Hey Andrew, don’t forget Ireland. England and Scotland are only a short hop over from the green isle.


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