stop me if this sounds familiar…

Ken Ham blasts God for not taking the Bible seriously
fear, loss of control, and theological conflict
Tullian Tchividjian, The Gospel Coalition, and a (rather obvious) theology problem
The Most Frightening Verse in the Bible (at least for me)
  • Brian P.

    With all the SSM in the news, I was reading a piece on where different denominations stand. Mainline denominations still have a bit of ecclesiology. Evangelicalism of the last number of decades seems to have given way to the non-denominational and megachurch experience. You know, the ones in the new suburbs of major cities.

    Anyhow, I was wondering how, ever, the Evangelical megachurchs can handle SSM. Is it going to be church-at-a-time? The megachurch pastors I’ve spoken with seem ill-equiped. They haven’t a clue about the power(s) that vest into their authorities.

    Then it hit me.

    The GOP has filled in a surrogacy role of the episcopacy of Evangelicalism the last few decades, especially for the megachurches. There are no ties that bind us together. The ecclesiology is the lowest its ever been in Christendom and thus it seems a political party needs to provide rallying and centralizing influence.

    Anyhow, the Calvin and Hobbes article made me think of this. How will Evangelicalism ever offer a Gospel to the world when its prophets look like this?

    http://www.clarionledger.com/story/opinion/columnists/2014/06/25/coulter-growing-interest-soccer-sign-nations-moral-decay/11372137/

    • Pixie5

      Ugh…and she gets PAID to say stuff like that??? The only consolation is that the comments were definately not flattering.

      Good points about the politicalization of evangelicalism/fundamentalism. I honestly never thought about it that way. Without opposing secular politics they have nothing to fight for and no cohesion. Well I would tell them that the best way to keep themselves together is simply TO CARE ABOUT THEIR FELLOW MAN. Try to find ways to help others instead of beating people over the head!

      • Brian P.

        Would be nice, but the fuel meeting Evangelicalism’s revivalistic spark and theological oxygen has always been about distancing from fellow man and the evils of the world. Would no longer be American Evangelicalism as it’s always been known.

        • Pixie5

          This is horrible, since I do believe in God, but I hate religion more and more because of its divisive influence. I have a huge amount of baggage. I don’t believe God has a religion. No offense to Dr. Enns or the readers here. At least there are Christians who are trying to fix these problems.

          So many of these fundies want a theocracy and that would be a total disaster. The history of the world and even our own country before we became a nation is littered with the corpses of non-Christians or Christians who did not believe the same as others. Well hell, even afterwards when people tried to force the Mormons out of Utah. The atmosphere of relative civility that we have enjoyed is ONLY because of our secular government protecting freedom of religion, which ironically is lost on these people.

          I believe more and more that if they managed to set up a theocracy then rather than the harmonious utopia that these idiots envision (mainly because they don’t know history or think they are the exception) then those groups that worked together to establish it would then turn on each other like ravenous wolves. The artificial political cohesion would disappear as sectarian conflicts set in. It wouldn’t be any different than what we see in many Muslim countries today.

          I was raised to believe it was only the Catholics that had been the problem. But now I know better. I wish I could be more optimistic.


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