Miracle Story: An Eyewitness to the Miracle at Fatima Remembers

Thousands of people witnessed the miracle at Fatima, October 13, 1917

My virtual friends, who blog at Biltrix, penned a wonderful post yesterday that I want to share with you.

Our Lady appeared to three Portuguese shepherd children in 1917. She prophesied the rise of communism in Russia and said that the way to end communism in Russia was to consecrate the nation to her Sacred Heart.

I didn’t know about this when the Soviet Union, after almost a century of threats and saber rattling, just dissolved. I did know that what was happening defied everything that history had taught us about despots, and dictators who grasp for world domination. These people don’t stop until guns and bullets stop them.

And yet, that is what happened. Many people gave many explanations, but nothing really explained it. It made no sense.

There is an old song that was popular a few years before the Soviet union dissolved itself called “Lawyers in Love.”

The song was a whimsical, humorous piece that contained the line “and the Russians went away as Russians will.” The reason the line was in the song was because it was a joke to think that the Russians (meaning the Communists) would just “go away.” The whole world at that time was standing perpetually on the brink of nuclear annihilation because of the Cold War. The joke lay in the absurdity of the notion that the Communist Russian threat would ever end without bloodshed.

Soviet Union

Soviet Union

But that is precisely what happened … as it was foretold by Our Lady to three shepherd children at Fatima, Portugal.

John Paul II believed that the prophecies Our Lady gave at Fatima also foretold his own attempted assassination. I have been to Fatima and seen the bullet which wounded the Pope. It is amazing that he could have survived.

At her last appearance to the shepherd children, an appearance that was witnessed by thousands of pilgrims, she performed what we now call “The Miracle of the Sun.” The post that is reprinted here is an eyewitness account of that miracle.

I think it’s a wonderful addition to our Lenten reflections.

Father Jason Smith

Biltrix is written by a group of people. The following post, by Father Jason Smith, is printed here with permission.

“See I Told You She Would Come:”  Testimony of an Eye Witness at Fatima

Things become old much too quickly.

Imagine my delight, then, when last Friday I met someone who told me his Grandmother was present on October 13, 1917 at Fatima; she was personally present at the moment when the sun danced and fell out of the sky.

Suddenly Fatima jumped out of history like the sun did that day and became relevant and modern to me.

I jotted down the account she had told him so I would not miss any of the details. I write it here because, first of all, it’s a miraculous story, and second of all, even if we might already know what happened at Fatima, an eyewitnesses account of a miracle always serves to freshen the memory and more importantly our faith.

News spread throughout the village that Lucia de Jesus and Francisco and Jacinta Marto—whose feast day it is today, February 20th—had received an apparition of a “lady brighter then the sun.” The Lady was holding a Rosary and told the children to return for five consecutive months, on the thirteenth of each month; moreover, on the day of the last apparition there would be a sign visible to all. That day had finally arrived.

His grandmother left her nine year old brother to watch the sheep and headed out into the driving rain and dropping temperature. The ground was completely muddy and the rocks were slippery. Over seventy thousand people had made the trek that morning, making the traveling conditions even worse. By the time she reached the apparition sight she was covered head to toe in mud and her clothes were completely soaked.

All types of people had gathered: those with faith who knelt and prayed the Rosary, those who were curious, and then there were the communists and atheists, many of whom were cursing, chiding, and yelling out cat-calls to Jacinta and Lucia. As the time went on and conditions worsened, it seemed as though nothing would happen and it became very tense among the people.

Then the rain stopped and the clouds parted. The sun shined and began to change colors and spin around itself in a mad whirl. It glittered and began to whirl even more wildly. Suddenly it loosened itself from the sky and fell threateningly toward the seventy thousand gathered below. People screamed. Many dropped face down into the mud or dropped to their knees. Those next to her who had been swearing began to cry for mercy. Then, just as quickly as it had started, it ended. The sun was back in its place.

Her hair, skin, and clothes were completely dry.  The ground around her was dry. There was no trace of mud on her. She felt completely clean, both inside and out. A man from her village who was crippled was able to walk. Several others who were sick were cured.

She prayed three Rosaries daily for the rest of her life in honor of what Mary asked, that we “say the Rosary every day, to bring peace to the world and an end to war.”

I know what my Lenten resolution will be this year: three daily Rosaries for peace. I invite you to the same.

If you haven’t seen it already I wholeheartedly recommend the 13th Day, an incredible film about the historic, but not ancient, event of Fatima.

YouTube Preview Image

  • http://www.rosariesforlife.com Dave

    Thanks so much for sharing that, Rebecca! I’ve always wondered how people can seriously study things like the Miracle at Fatima and not come out a believer.

    • Rebecca Hamilton

      Me too. I think they just brush them aside with superficial excuses for rejection without looking deeper.

  • http://biltrix.com Biltrix

    Thanks for the article and the reblog and for linking back to our page, Rebecca. God bless!

    • Rebecca Hamilton

      Thank you for allowing me to post it here. It’s a beautiful story.

  • Bill S

    One can safely reject reports of anything that violates the laws of nature. With that exception I accept the accounts of those who witnessed what they witnessed with a healthy dose of skepticism.

    Would anyone expect any other response from me?

    • http://www.rosariesforlife.com Dave

      I’m not sure if I expected any other response, but your response is not reasonable. If one is open to the possibility that God exists, then one needs to study this carefully. If one has already decided that it is impossible that God should exist, then I guess they would proffer your response.

      • http://coalitionforclarity.blogspot.com/ Robert King

        Even if one is not “open to the possibility”, but is only interested in evidence, the testimony of so many witnesses from so many different backgrounds is significant evidence that something happened, and that what happened had at least the features that the witnesses agreed upon. One witness with an ideosyncratic story can generally be ignored; hundreds or thousands demands at least a second look.

        Reasonable people can disagree about the cause(s) of the event. It is not replicable, or at least has never been replicated (I’m not sure if anyone has tried, or how they would go about trying), so the causes are difficult, if not impossible, to determine scientifically. It may be the most we can say with certainty is, “Well, something weird seems to have happened there.”

        However, to reject the reports out of hand is to deliberately close oneself to the evidence.

        • http://www.rosariesforlife.com Dave

          Right…as far as we know, what happened may have some as-yet-unknown scientific explanation (though personally I doubt it). But regardless, the timing of it makes it a miracle in my book.

    • Skittle

      “One can safely reject reports of anything that violates the laws of nature.”

      That has to be the least scientific thing I have ever read. How do you imagine these “laws of nature” were derived in the first place? Do you think our current form of them is the form we have always used, and will always use? How do we know to change them?

      Do you reject reports of rains of fish and frogs? Do you reject reports of ball lightning? Do you reject reports of giant squid? Charles Fort would have a field day. This isn’t even about religion: just the attitude that data can be rejected because it doesn’t fit, and that this is viewed as scientific and rational.

  • Bill S

    Good use of the word proffer. I had to look it up. I don’t think it would offend God if a person made it a policy not to believe anything that defies the laws of nature. Thomas Jefferson eliminated all references to miracles from his Bible.

    (I knew Thomas Jefferson. Thomas Jefferson was a friend of mine. Trust me, Bill. You’re no Thomas Jefferson).

    Catholics are not required to believe in apparitions. Even if I want to stay true to the faith, I don’t have to believe in Fatima or in any other Marian apparitions. I simply choose not to.

  • PatrickG

    I think it was central planning that destroyed the USSR. Economists such as von Mises had long taught (correctly) that central planners would never have enough information to effectively manage an advanced economy, unlike a market, which integrates the information of all of its participants and presents it in the form of price signals. So, I think a reasonable (primary) explanation is that the failure of central planning led to the demise of the USSR without a war.

  • http://jessicahof.wordpress.com/ Jessica Hoff

    Thank you, Rebecca – 13th day is a wonderful film.

  • Bill S

    “However, to reject the reports out of hand is to deliberately close oneself to the evidence.”

    To close oneself to the evidence is to maintain a worldview that does not allow one to be drawn into an unquestioning devotion to the Catholic Church. That frees up the mind to look at life more rationally and logically.

    There are natural explanations for the entire story. Just start out with the premise that the laws of nature cannot be violated and work your way back to sanity from there.

    • Theodore Seeber

      I do not know of any system of thought that can possibly find truth by denying data.

  • Bill S

    There was a pretty good response to this but it was deleted. It is Rebecca’s right and practice to delete the most convincing arguments by unbelievers.


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