‘The animals are coming,’ so drive up the price of Ron Paul’s investments in gold

Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, presents himself as a libertarian who believes in smaller, limited government and a strict adherence to the Constitution.

Hogwash.

For decades, Ron Paul churned out vile newsletters peddling unfiltered racism, anti-gay hysteria, and anti-Semitic, John Birch Society “trilateral” insanity.

If you’ve got the stomach for it, you can peruse dozens of these at Mr. Destructo. It’s the kind of old-school, flagrant racism you only see inside a closed circle of angry white people certain that only other angry white people are listening. This is how white racists talk when they’re confident that no one who isn’t a white racist — no one black or brown and/or smart — might overhear what they’re saying. It’s despicable stuff.

Here are Ron Paul’s suggestions for renaming New York City: “Welfaria. Zooville. Rapetown. Dirtburg. Lazyopolis.”

And here is his advice for his readers who live in “a major city”:

You’ve probably already heard about the newest threat to your life and limb, and your family: carjacking.

It is the hip-hop thing to do among the urban youth who play unsuspecting whites like pianos. … In the old days, average people could avoid such youth by staying out of bad neighborhoods. Empowered by media, police and political complicity, however, the youth now roam everywhere looking for cars to steal and people to rob.

What can you do? More and more Americans are carrying a gun in the car. An ex-cop I know advises that if you have to use a gun on a youth, you should leave the scene immediately, disposed of the wiped off gun as soon as possible. Such a gun cannot, of course, be registered to you, but one bought privately (through the classifieds, for example).

I frankly don’t know what to make of such advice, but even in my little town of Lake Jackson, Texas, I’ve urged everyone in my family to know how to use a gun in self defense. For the animals are coming.

That, in essence, is the recurring theme of these Ron Paul newsletters: “The animals are coming.” Watch out for “the coming race war in our big cities.”

Civilization is under attack, Paul’s newsletters warned. So arm yourself. And invest in gold. Not stocks and bonds, not bank deposits, just gold.

Ron Paul is invested in gold. The value of those investments is ultimately based on just one thing: Getting lots of other people to invest in the same thing. As Joshua Brown puts it, gold is “the ultimate supply-demand trend bet.”

And Ron Paul, like everyone else who’s ever used the word “trilateralist” unironically, is all-in on that bet.

Observe any far-right fringe organization, publication, website or radio show and you’ll find ads urging you to put all your savings into gold. Those ads will be juxtaposed with non-advertising content urging the same thing. From Ron Paul to Rush Limbaugh to Glenn Beck to Brannon Howse, this is how these guys make a living. It’s a racket, a scam, a long con — and a lucrative one, apparently.

Now, just because Ron Paul is up to his ears in this invest-in-gold scam doesn’t mean he isn’t also a true believer in the nasty “the animals are coming” racist filth he’s promoted for years to push up demand for gold.

Maybe he believes this garbage, or maybe it’s nothing more than a cynical scam. But those are the only options. As Ta-Nehisi Coates notes, the best we can say about Ron Paul is that he might not be a bigot, “simply part of a coalition who saw bigotry as a potent political force … the ugly tradition of non-racist demagogues”:

It is comforting to think of racism as species of misanthropy, or akin to child molestation, thus exonerating all those who bear no real hatred in their heart. It’s much more troubling to think of it as its always been — a means of political organization and power distribution. Such a definition makes the “I’m a good person” defense irrelevant.

I could easily believe that Ron Paul holds no more particular disdain for blacks than George Wallace or John Patterson. These were not evil men. They were good people, who consented to evil in the pursuit of power.

And that is why Ron Paul, whatever else he may be, is not a libertarian or an advocate of smaller government or a friend to the Constitution.

Because when power is attained by such means it becomes power in service of those means.

If you want to know what Ron Paul’s “small-government” utopia of personal liberty looks like, just read the following.

Nicholas K. Peart, “Young, Black and Frisked by the NYPD

Last May, I was outside my apartment building on my way to the store when two police officers jumped out of an unmarked car and told me to stop and put my hands up against the wall. I complied. Without my permission, they removed my cellphone from my hand, and one of the officers reached into my pockets, and removed my wallet and keys. He looked through my wallet, then handcuffed me. The officers wanted to know if I had just come out of a particular building. No, I told them, I lived next door.

One of the officers asked which of the keys they had removed from my pocket opened my apartment door. Then he entered my building and tried to get into my apartment with my key. My 18-year-old sister was inside with two of our younger siblings; later she told me she had no idea why the police were trying to get into our apartment and was terrified. She tried to call me, but because they had confiscated my phone, I couldn’t answer.

Meanwhile, a white officer put me in the back of the police car. I was still handcuffed. The officer asked if I had any marijuana, and I said no. He removed and searched my shoes and patted down my socks. I asked why they were searching me, and he told me someone in my building complained that a person they believed fit my description had been ringing their bell. After the other officer returned from inside my apartment building, they opened the door to the police car, told me to get out, removed the handcuffs and simply drove off. I was deeply shaken.

Radley Balko: “Kafka Surrenders

The trial court, the appellate court, and the prosecution all concluded that these two cops broke the law, yet still, all three have deemed that the cops’ testimony is more credible than the testimony of Crossland, his cousin, and the other witnesses — none of whom was doing anything wrong before the confrontation. … Only one party broke the law before the confrontation. But because that party sports a badge and works for the government, they still get the presumption of credibility over the guy who was minding his own business, his cousin, and the other witnesses. …

Police need only the flimsiest of suspicions to stop you on the street, detain you, and search you. But even if they don’t even have that, they aren’t likely to suffer any serious sanction for an illegal search. Nor is a court likely to believe you should you try to complain. If you resist — physically or verbally, whether the search was legal or illegal — they can bring the hammer down, with damn-near impunity. And after the violence, you’ll be the one going to jail.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Matthew-McDonald/610556997 Matthew McDonald

    Um….Merry Christmas?

  • Anonymous

    I asked why they were searching me, and he told me someone in my building complained that a person they believed fit my description had been ringing their bell.

    Sure, the police officers’ behavior was cruel and unjust, but what choice did they have?  There was a bell-ringer on the loose!

  • http://jesustheram.blogspot.com/ Mr. Heartland

    Libertarianism: the belief that what you own is who you are, the insistence that in America what you own has always been understood as the basis of your relationship to the greater society and the law.  This is an aristocratic conceit, most obviously so when the right to kill for one’s property is declared to be self-evident and instinctively understood.  And anyone who is unable to see how this delusion of nobility just might have some connection to traditional White male power and the desire to preserve it is in all likelihood trying very very hard not to see it. 

  • Daughter

    To be fair, I listen to progressive radio (KPTK, AM1090 in Seattle), and they advertise for buying gold all the time, too.  They do make a point of saying, “Don’t buy it because extremist morons think the world is coming to the end.  Buy it because it’s a good investment.”

  • Daughter

    Tom Levenson at Balloon Juice slammed libertarianism in this way:

    You cannot have liberty without justice.  There.  I said it.

    Bluntly, if you do not have, say, equal treatment before the law, then those sacrificed for others’ liberty invalidate the concept for all involved.  … I think the basic principle is obvious—and it is grasped by anyone who gets the idea that the exercise of my property rights to dump sewage into my stretch of river does injustice, and is illiberal, by the time it reaches your run of the water.  This really isn’t hard.

  • http://www.facebook.com/swbaxter13 Scott Baxter


    Libertarianism: the belief that what you own is who you are, the insistence that in America what you own has always been understood as the basis of your relationship to the greater society and the law. 

    Well, for somebody like Paul who’s all a-shiver over “the original intent of the founders,” that’s a completely reasonable thing to believe. Because they did in fact believe that it was natural for one’s wealth to determine one’s access to lawful power. After all, they wrote a document that created at least four classes of citizens – land-holders (almost exclusively white men), others grudgingly eligible to vote (also almost exclusively white men), those without the right to vote but ineligible to be taken as slaves (women, and most minorities), and slaves. It’s worth remembering that when Paul or those like him talk about getting back to the original intent of the constitution, this is ultimately what they’re defending.

    Of course, this is also a uniquely American take on Libertarianism; historically, Libertarians came from the left side of the spectrum, anarchists who believed that states retained a monopoly on violence because that was necessary to enforce the private ownership of capital, and that abolishing nation-states was a necessary step in workers seizing the means of production. Some time in the early 20th century USA it was co-opted by rich people to describe a philosophy where wealth determined access to justice, and that’s lead to the current “rights and regulations just get in the way of rich people getting richer, so they’re bad” ideology.

  • Anonymous

    Heaven help us all if this man became President. I understand that war does wonders for the price of gold …

    On the upside, the choice of Republican candidates appears to be a choice between Ghastly, Greedy, Gruesome, Godawful and Grim. This can only be good for Obama and if he gets a second term perhaps it will give him a public mandate to make some real changes. Merry Christmas everyone. Or Hannukah, Kwanza, Winter Solstice or what you will.

  • Anonymous

    As always I bust out the Robinson quote, “Libertarians, anarchists who want police protection from their slaves.” 

  • FangsFirst

    I could easily believe that Ron Paul holds no more particular disdain
    for blacks than George Wallace or John Patterson. These were not evil
    men. They were good people, who consented to evil in the pursuit of
    power.

    “And George Wallace died back in ’98 and he’s in Hell now, not because
    he’s a racist. His track record as a judge and his late-life quest for
    redemption make a good argument for his being, at worst, no worse than
    most white men of his generation, North or South. But because of his
    blind ambition and his hunger for votes, he turned a blind eye to the
    suffering of black America. And he became a pawn in the fight against
    the Civil Rights cause.”

    Thank you, Patterson Hood.

  • Anonymous

    America has clearly become a police state. Right now the Pentagon is giving out heavy duty weaponry to local police precincts. It’s just sad because there are so many good people who are police officers, but they’ve been given runaway power in order to keep the American people in check. And we all know the press is incredibly pro-police as the Occupy protests showed us.

    America is rapidly descending into a fascist state and there’s apparently nothing that we can do to stop it.

  • mdhpiper

    If Wallace’s remorse and attempt at redemption was legit then he’s probably not in hell, regardless of how despicable he was or how many people suffered or how badly. The worst of the worst will be let in if they truly repent and ask for salvation. If he’s not allowed then what would make anyone else of us think we deserve to make the cut?

  • Ken

    As Joshua Brown puts it, gold is “the ultimate supply-demand trend bet.”

    “Bubble” is eight syllables shorter.

  • Dan Allison

    I’m not that comfortable proclaiming anyone’s eternal destiny, even my own. 

  • P J Evans

    I live in one of those big cities that Paul thinks is about to be overrun by ‘the animals’. I think the people who have retreated to their gated-and-guarded communities are no longer quite connected to reality: the reality is that the city is not a hotbed of crime, and most brown and black people aren’t bad guys who have to be defended against. And most of us don’t even own guns. (I suspect that gated-and-guarded developments get a higher class of criminals living there: the medium-to-large drug dealers, the mortgage scammers, the spam promoters, the ambulance chasers. And the second-rank media people.)

  • Daughter

    In one of my first post-college apartments, I lived with two women in a suburban community.  After a few months, one of them moved to the city, toone of those so-called “crime-ridden areas.”  Not long after that I was mugged, the only time in my life that’s happened (and I’ve lived in the city most of my life), on my suburban street at 6 pm.

    The next time I saw my former roommate, I told her what had happened.  I knew what she was going to say as soon as I saw the cheeky grin appear on her face.  She didn’t disappoint: “Gee, Daughter, you should move to a safe neighborhood — like mine!”

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    The ever-shifting, amorphous dangerous criminal is the bogeyman constantly waved around by the political right for their own interests, or because it’s kind of like a security blanket of self-justification for gun owners.

    These heroes in their own minds would probably widdle their pants* if a criminal ever actually entered their house.

    —-

    * 99.something % of the time. the other fraction is composed of people properly trained in weapon usage who could actually properly subdue and/or repel a burglar.

  • FangsFirst

    If Wallace’s remorse and attempt at redemption was legit then he’s
    probably not in hell, regardless of how despicable he was or how many
    people suffered or how badly. The worst of the worst will be let in if
    they truly repent and ask for salvation. If he’s not allowed then what
    would make anyone else of us think we deserve to make the cut

    I’m not that comfortable proclaiming anyone’s eternal destiny, even my own.

    I should clarify: Patterson Hood is frontman for Drive-By Truckers. That’s from a song (actually, that one amounts to spoken word) on Southern Rock Opera, called “The Three Great Alabama Icons,” (Ronnie Van Zant, George Wallace and Bear Bryant). It follows the quote I posted with this:

    Fortunately for him, the Devil is also a southerner. So this song’s gonna take place in Hell, told from the Devil’s point of view
    As he does what any good southerner would do when company’s comin’: He brewed up some good sweet tea, he whips up some southern hospitality for the arrival of a new guest

    I suspect Patterson is not literally suggesting Wallace is in hell, so much as emphasizing his negative opinion of Wallace, and then putting in the twist on the expectation that he be considered evil for his racism, by saying it’s actually his *use* of racism to gain personal power.

  • Rikalous

    So Ron Paul’s ex-cop friend advised his readers to assume that when they “use a gun on a youth”, they should hide the evidence rather than go to court and claim self defense, that they will use their guns to commit murder rather than to protect their lives. That’s…gah. That’s rock-bottom-and-digging-merrily stuff.

  • Anonymous

    I believe what is being described there would be what us dirty rotten tree hugging liberals would call a “felony”.

  • P J Evans

     The only advice I’ve ever heard anyone offer along that line was to make sure that the body is inside the house, so you can claim self-defense. It wasn’t to use a swap-meet-type gun and lose it immediately after.

  • Rikalous

    I thought we were soft on crime, though. Not like those law-and-order folks on the right.

  • FangsFirst

    I thought we were soft on crime, though. Not like those law-and-order folks on the right.

    Ah, but you are making a cardinal mistake: Crime only counts when brown people commit it.
    With that paradigm in mind, it’s all peachy keen!

  • wendy

    Merry Christmas everyone. Or Hannukah, Kwanza, Winter Solstice or what you will.

    For the atheists among us — Today is Isaac Newton’s Birthday!! Happy G=9.8M/S2 to all, and eat an apple. 

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Also, happy Gm1m2 / r^2 :D

    More srs note:

    Someone I knew who owned a gun advocated shooting a burglar then purposely shooting your wall, then claiming the opposite ordering of shots to the police. Apparently, “missed the first time” somehow translates to “valid proof of self-defence”. O.o

  • Anonymous

    I thought we were soft on crime, though. Not like those law-and-order folks on the right.

    The Republican Party is notoriously soft on white collar crime, even though it is far more damaging than robberies and drug dealing.

  • modusoperandi00

    Oh sure, you’re laughing now…but you won’t be smiling when you’re ambushed at your own front door by carolers!

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Deck the world with smiling faces,
    fa la la la la, la la la la.

    Deck the Halls, Alvin & the Chipmunks version. ;)

  • Indiana Joe

    Here we come a wassailing!

  • Madhabmatics

    People aren’t making near enough jokes about popular American presidential candidate Hong Bopei

  • Madhabmatics

    Where’s the birth certificate [i]bopei[/i]

  • Aliciabrighton

    He’s a reasonable, sensible, moderate Republican. Naturally, he’s at the bottom of the race, far behind Santorum.

  • FangsFirst

    Deck the Halls with Boston Charlie?

  • guest

    I celebrated Isaac Newton day yesterday by reading Newton’s chronology of the ancient Gentile empires and writing a paper on the political influences on his theory of gravitation for an upcoming British Society for the History of Science conference.  I’ll be celebrating today similarly as well….

  • ako

    A boy I knew in high school had to deal with being stopped and searched by the police because he “fit the description” of a suspect.  The suspect was described as a large thirty-something man with a shaven head who’d been seen traveling by car.  The boy I knew was a thin sixteen-year-old boy with a fair amount of hair who was riding his bike home from school and stopped off at a convenience store.   Seeing as how we were all comfortable middle-class suburban kids in a mostly-white town, this was the first time I learned that “Fit the description” sometimes simply meant “black”. 

  • Anonymous

    Er, not to pick nits, but shouldn’t that be s^2, to distinguish it from 2S or S-sub-2? (sorry, mathematical pedant)

  • Anonymous

    Wow.  I grew up in Alabama, and it still boggles my mind that people can be that racist post-civil-rights-movement.  And bear in mind, I heard the whole “affirmative action encourages hire of ‘token blacks,’ not qualified workers” garbage for so long that it was a shock to my system to learn otherwise.

  • Lori

    Wow.  I grew up in Alabama, and it still boggles my mind that people can be that racist post-civil-rights-movement. 

    This is one of the reasons that I strongly suspect Ron Paul really is a racist himself, even if he didn’t personally write the newsletter articles. The stuff in those articles is the kind of vitriol that racists spew when they’re talking to each other. They tend to be more circumspect and coded when they’re talking to an audience whose sympathies they’re not totally sure of. I find it really hard to believe that even a serious racist would publish that under the name of someone whose attitudes weren’t known to be sympathetic.

  • P J Evans

     Like the person at work who is circumspect when talking to people who have power over hir employment, but who will, when talking to underlings, especially one on one, say things that make it clear said fellow-employee is anti-union (the union doesn’t like hir, either, having had hir as a member long enough to learn about hir bad habits) and also not fond of people with darker skin.

    If there were witnesses, I’d report hir to HR for violating the business conduct guidelines.

  • Matri

    Apparently, “missed the first time” somehow translates to “valid proof of self-defence”. O.o

    *checks rest of thread* Wow, no one’s said it yet? Okay, here goes:

    “Han shot first!”

    *hides*

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jonathan-Pelikan/100000903137143 Jonathan Pelikan

    The Republican Party likes to pretend they have values and ethics relating to crime and law when it might allow them to accumulate more power than they currently hold.

  • Rob Brown

    This Young Turks video seems worth linking to here.

    If Ron Paul’s views on minorities are accurately reflected in those newsletters, then okay, maybe he isn’t worth voting for.  But all that’ll mean is that I won’t send in a ballot at all on election day 2012, because after signing the NDAA authorizing indefinite detention of American citizens, Obama has proven he’s not worthy to be president either.  (And a post on that would’ve been nice to see, Fred.  It was kind of a big deal.)

  • Sofia

    Walla walla wash and Kalamazoo.

  • atmosphere14

    Good point. I certainly hate those statements by Ron Paul, but I would still have voted for him, or well preferably for Garry Johnson or anyone with the understanding that the NDAA is unacceptable. The human rights make sense only when applied to all humans, serial killer and terrorists included, and a fortiori for any mere ‘suspects’.


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