Faith is a process of Incarnation – UPDATED

Over at Conversion Diary, Jennifer Fulwiler has been serving up an inspiring interview with an couple named couple named Kimberly and Jimmy, who are in the process of adopting two HIV+ children from Ethiopia. This is a remarkable three-part testimony to the life of faith, the rewards of trust and the often-neglected truth that if we simply pay attention to the promptings of the Holy Spirit, we will know precisely the way we are to go.

In Part I we read about surprises and “when everything hits the fan.” Part II explores the listening a bit more, and also the practicalities involved. Part III takes on the world, and truth about love. I especially like the final bit:

I’ve learned that while perfect faithfulness should be what we all aspire to, one-foot-in-front-of-the-other faithfulness is often the best I can give, and thankfully, it’s often enough. You do not need to be extraordinary; you just need to keep going.

That sentiment reminds me of a line in Mother Angelica’s Little Book of Life Lessons and Everyday Spirituality (which I excerpted here) and it validates the feelings of this couple:

“Faith is one foot on the ground, one foot in the air and a queasy feeling in the stomach.”

Faith is also a process of Incarnation – of becoming who and what you were born to be. When you are doing what you are meant to do, the queasiness vanishes. Identifying a calling is no easy thing. Following a calling can sometimes be difficult, but it is always grace-filled, because when you understand what you are called to, you understand who you are.

And of course, whatever you undertake, you are never alone. God Runs to You Upon Your Barest Intent.

St. Catherine of Siena
has something to say about that, too.

UPDATE: Speaking of callings and knowing who you are – Deacon Greg gives a heads up about the lead story for tonight’s broadcast over at Currents: tonight’s edition of “Currents” features an inspiring report on some young women making their first profession as Little Sisters of the Poor. You can watch a live stream here at 7:30 and 11:30 ET.

I’m really looking forward to seeing that, as one of the sisters making her profession is Sr. Maria Lourdes, a lovely young woman who participated in an interview on vocations for In the Arena. I met her and was frankly dazzled by the luminescent joy she took in her vocation. Moving from novitiate to simple profession, Sr. Lourdes and her companions receive the habit and black veil. Pray for them, that God may bring to completion what he has begun.

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About Elizabeth Scalia
  • Mike

    The “Prodigal Son” is my favorite/most challenging parable of all. The younger son had enough faith in his father’s love to come back and his father rewarded it beyond all expectation. The older son took it all for granted and had to be ever so gently reminded that he had always had the best that was to be had. I am more like the older son that I like to admit.


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