Clearing out the tab

I’ve got some deadlines to meet and a project I’d like to get started, so I need to stop futzing around, reading news and blogs and get to it. Here is what’s been cluttering up my tab-bar for the last day or so – it’s a bit of a jumble, sorry:


Malta, shamelessly cribbed from Crescat

Beautiful Malta! Where Doug Kmiec is the new US Ambassador after what Dan Gilgoff describes as a “strange religious/political” swearing in. Kmiec is the Catholic former Reagan WH Legal Counsel who campaigned passionately for Barack Obama, believing that Obama’s stance on abortion was compatible with Catholicism, or could be reasoned to be so…or something.

Crucifixes vs “Risen Christs. Long a bugaboo of mine, this piece explores the differences and comes out in favor of crucifixes. I agree. The crucifix is instructive and consoling as I have written before:

When we look at the Crucifix we see that there is no human situation that Jesus did not come to know. Feel betrayed? Feel humiliated? Being mocked and sneered at? Feel abandoned? Feel unjustly hurt? Feel loss? There, on that crucifix is the God who has known every one of those feelings, and has submitted to them – in order to save us, but also in order to draw us near, to gather us into a consolation, a consoling embrace that says…“I know what you’re feeling…I know what you’re thinking…we are actually all in this together, and quite outside of time.” It’s hard to remember all that. The Crucifix is the reminder.

Van Jones Uber-Radical/9/11 Truther Watch: Joe Carter says the White House will soon learn to google someone before appointing him to something. Yes, if they do that first, they can always ask google to clean things up a little, too. I say Jones’ll be thrown under the bus by Monday, after the Sunday Gasbag Shows. Your guess?

Take care of the crisis in marriage and the rest will follow. That’s what NYC Archbishop Timothy Dolan says, and I agree. When fundamentals are strong, the rest can be supported by them.

The World Feminist Deathmatch:
Attila’s got it covered

Gratitude: The importance and nature of it. A good read.

In prison for protesting abortion:
I am not sure how I feel about this story or its tone, just yet. Need to think and pray on it, a bit. But I think you’ll find it interesting.

A Martyred Faith: Joseph Bottoms looks at Fatima al-Mutayri

New realities undercut old positions on immigration. Longtime readers know I parted ways with the conservative base on this issue (see the category). We’ll be talking about it again!

“Some patients being wrongly judged as close to death.”
There is a whole deatheater mindset out there. They can’t feed death fast enough, and it’s so easy to rationalize limits on life.

Byron York: Obamacare means more power for the IRS.

Ed Morrissey says:
it also means higher prescription plan premiums. Also, says York, Obama is making an error, here

Bl. Teresa of Calcutta: Insights from Fr. Neuhaus, and it’s a must-read, so don’t miss it:

After I had preached one morning, she pushed a book across the kitchen table: “Reading is good but make your meditation before you preach and then just tell the people what Jesus told you.” I had the sense that she was on a special wavelength. On my way to say Mass for her in New York, I found myself in the subway standing in front of a kiosk featuring magazines with women who were only innocent of the Legion of Decency. After Mass, although I had said nothing, she said, “On your way through the streets when you are coming to say Mass, don’t look at the magazines with the women on the covers.” By showing the utter naturalness of supernaturalness, saints are a sacrament of the transfiguration. All through the Christian annals it has seemed perfectly natural and not silly to tell them, “You gotta save Christianity. You gotta.”

Kathryn J. Lopez wonders: Hey, where’s the American flag?

Does Obama Heart Despots?: The Honduras loses aid for umm…upholding its constitution against a despotic power grab. Obama and Hillary are punishing them for it, while most pay no attention. Jimmie Bise is rightly ashamed of what our government is doing:

Our government is demanding that the current government of Honduras violate its own laws to return a man to power who ignored the lawful orders of his own courts and deliberately attempted to violate the Honduran Constitution to satisfy his own desire to remain in office longer. Our position is shameful and wrong and it needs to change.

The President should turn around on this issue right now. He has put us on the side of tyrants and that is never a place the United States should be. Not ever.

Damn straight.

How to avoid the lap of the Pharisees

Missing Bill Buckley: God and Man at Yale</a is on my reading list, if I can ever get to it.

Episcopal Nuns take the plunge
: And
into the Tiber -or across it. Their habits are perhaps the most old-fashioned I’ve ever seen.

Quin Hillyer: Obama is not Jimmy Carter

Bookworm: Obama is also not Hitler

Peggy Noonan: Obama is young, inexperienced and triumphal

More on Bishop Martino: fisking Time Magazine’s spin

300 Grandchildren: Well, God bless her!

Obama and school kids:
Satire

Compassion: Can it be part of a war equation?

Me, me, me: Got an EWTN catalogue in the mail today and was surprised to see this in it. Heh. Found it here, too.

Deep-fried Butter

About Elizabeth Scalia
  • Bender

    Does Obama Heart Despots?: The Honduras loses aid for umm…upholding its constitution against a despotic power grab.

    Like many parishes around here, we have a “sister” parish in Honduras. In our case, San Marcos in Gracias, Lempira.

    Now would be a good time for us to send them a few extra dollars and make up the difference lost by El Uno.

  • btsea

    I am surprised how little mention marriage gets during sermons. You would think there is no marriage crisis at all. You might here something about it once or twice a year (the wedding at Cana, or “wives be submissive to your husbands”), three or four minutes on marriage, but it would seem that since most people end up getting married, and that since marriage is a sacrament, and that because in the last several decades just about everyone would admit that it is under assault…it would seem that it would merit an abundance of discussion, and yet there is a virtual silence about it, almost as if the subject is embarrassing. Do we expect our kids to grow up and marry (and even have strong marriages) if marriage is never discussed in Church? We need to hear about the joys of marriage, we need to hear about the sacrifice of marriage, we need to hear about the beauty of having children, we need to hear about God’s purpose in our lives through His gift of marriage, and we need to hear about how those things that distract one from one’s marriage commitment or that denigrate marriage are truly just that–distractions and denigrations. The nobility of marriage has been lost. The reality of the sacrament has been lost, and it needs to be rediscovered…in the Church.

  • Bender

    Crucifixes vs Risen Christs:

    Without the Passion, without the torture of the Scourging, the Mocking, the Crown of Thorns, and the Crucifixion, there is no Resurrection.

    For the last couple of years, Pope Benedict has spoken about love necessarily meaning suffering, that there can be no love without suffering. I’m still trying to get a handle on exactly what he means, and the ramifications of that in this utilitarian world that abhors and runs away from any and all suffering, but I suspect it is something along the lines of true and complete love invariably leading to the Cross.

  • dry valleys

    If there really are fewer immigrants coming in, & I can believe it, now is the time to secure the borders & implement a points-based system for only admitting a few immigrants in the years to come. The author of that piece essentially agree with me- the world as it existed before 2007 is dead so let’s give it a dignified funeral & move on to a future that has a solid basis rather than being a fantasy.

    Funnily, immigration is almost the only issue on which I agree with conservatives (or some of them: the GOP leadership has always supported open borders because it makes them money). It was short-sighted & silly to admit so many people, & in Britain this is even more so.

    Labour shortages should have compelled businesses to become more efficient & productive with what workers there were, competing to offer better working conditions & wages, rather than just getting anyone in to do unskilled jobs with nary a thought to the social consequences… or for that matter the environmental impact of people from high-fertility countries arriving in droves & increasing the population of already crowded countries. (I also, of course, support family planning, & I think there’s now fairly solid proof that people given a good basic education & economic prosperity will choose to limit their own families).

    I don’t attach any priority to family reconciliation. They should leave their families behind- they can help them by sending back remittances, which does more than foreign aid to make the Third World more prosperous.

    What we have in particular is people from more patriarchal countries, such as India & Pakistan, marrying girls (often close relatives) from the countries their parents were from, people who were born here but can’t even find wives at home. In Denmark I believe they have laws stating that girls under 21 cannot be brought in for these purposes, & a lot of leftists agree with me that this is a good idea to prevent exploitation.

    (The author is a left-wing Sikh- elements of Sikhism & Hinduism have many of the same problems with misogyny & homophobia as the more reactionary versions of Islam).

    Of course, Mexicans tend not to behave in such a way. But have you ever thought that they are very socially conservative & very often churchgoers? Do you think this might be why you are a bit warmer towards them than the more secular right-wingers?

    On about this further- I am “asquith” as I usually am on blogs. (But wanted a change when selecting my username here).

    You, further, need to listen to Quin Hilyer. Obama’s policies may have the worst impact in the world on America. But he is a fantastically skilled politician. I hope the right don’t recover in 2010 or 2012. :) But you do, & it’s in all our interests that there isn’t some one-party ascendancy. Take it from someone who’s groaned under unchecked rule by one party & then unchecked rule by another. (I don’t say “right” or “left” because I don’t consider Brown & cronies to be left-wing).

  • Joseph Marshall

    Re: In Prison For Protesting Abortion

    I note that the author is extremely coy about what his friend actually did at that abortion clinic. I doubt it was a heinous crime, but I’m pretty sure that anyone would judge it to be a genuine crime. Which is why the author is not specific about it.

    Here is the essence of the issue:

    One of the original apostles who joined Joan Andrews in organizing Operation Rescue, Crouchback has never reconciled himself to the movement’s collapse — under the pressure of madly punitive laws that make abortion clinics “speech-free” zones, as sacrosanct as the Lincoln Bedroom. At what other business in America is it a felony to engage in civil disobedience?

    As the old quotation from a wise judge says, “Your right to free speech ends where his nose begins.” And if the space around an abortion clinic is “as sacrosanct as Lincoln’s bedroom” it is because far too many fists ended up in contact with far too many noses there.

    Not to mention the fact that many of the fist wielders have graduated to capital murder by explosives and firearms.

    And certainly capital murder is a felony when committed at any business.

  • dellbabe68

    “When we look at the Crucifix we see that there is no human situation that Jesus did not come to know. Feel betrayed? Feel humiliated? Being mocked and sneered at? Feel abandoned? Feel unjustly hurt? Feel loss? There, on that crucifix is the God who has known every one of those feelings, and has submitted to them – in order to save us, but also in order to draw us near, to gather us into a consolation, a consoling embrace that says…“I know what you’re feeling…I know what you’re thinking…we are actually all in this together, and quite outside of time.” It’s hard to remember all that. The Crucifix is the reminder.”

    Though it wasn’t as serious as this (!) I needed to hear this today more than most days. Thanks.

    On not enough sermons on marriage: I’m feeling a little grumpy right now about being damn-near invisible in my church since I don’t go with a husband or family. I’m sick of priests looking past me to the next person in line as I shake their hand, trying to tell them they gave a great sermon. In fact, I’ve now taken the hint and stopped going to shake their hand after church at all, and leave through the side door. It’s been going on for too long.

  • Pingback: All American Blogger » The Van Jones Story and Blogosphere Roundup

  • Bill McCorkle

    I fear Van Jones will remain czar just to spite the bourgeoisie. Viva la revolucion!

  • Gina

    Malta, eh? So that’s the price for selling out the unborn? Many did so far more cheaply.

    As for Honduras, I can’t help wondering if there is more here. Obama’s fixation on this situation, his disastrous handling of it, is just too puzzling. I wonder if Honduras was among those small nations pressured to take Gitmo detainees, said no, and this is payback.

    While I’m talking conspiracy theories, I also wonder if Megrahi was the price for Bermuda taking Gitmo detainees. With respective plausible deniability (“what?! we knew nothing about this- we’re outraged”) first on Britain’s side, and then eerily similar on the part of the Obama administration regarding Megrahi.

  • dry valleys

    Al Franken engaging in some business with protestors

  • dry valleys

    Comment has disappeared somewhere- on about Al Franken dealing with some protestors

    [found it in the spam filter -admin]

  • DaveW

    Crucifixes vs Risen Christs

    The linked author’s assertion that “…it is nearly impossible to find a crucifix in a Catholic Church in the United States.” isn’t true.

    Maybe its a regional thing and if so that’s a shame but in our Archdiocese I haven’t been in a church yet that doesn’t have a crucifix behind the alter, usually life sized. Ours was imported from Italy and it dominates the sanctuary.

  • cathyf

    …Long a bugaboo of mine, this piece explores the differences and comes out in favor of…

    You know, one of the great strengths and joys of being “catholic” (with a small ‘c’) is that we are called to be “both/and” rather than “either/or” people. We have a depth and richness that encompasses many different signs and teachings and consolations, and God has given them all to us freely, they are not scarce resources that must be chosen between, rationed out, one given up to get to another.

    Of course recognizing this means that it’s particularly odd to think that in order to build something up you must contrast it with something else which you then pick apart and criticize.

    I find it interesting that you would place your 2007 post up as agreement with Pakaluk’s piece. Your posting is brilliantly catholic-with-a-small-c, pointing out the wisdom and consolation in all sorts of places that it is found, while his relies on the small meaness of attack and tearing down.

  • Bender

    **I haven’t been in a church yet that doesn’t have a crucifix behind the alter, usually life sized**

    The crucifix at our parish (custom-made by an Italian artisan) is huge, much bigger than life-sized, having replaced one that is about four-feet (which we use for veneration of the Cross on Good Friday). The interesting thing about the new one is that Jesus is in extremis, still enduring the Passion in the process of dying, just a moment or two prior to death, so He does not have the spear-wound in the side yet.


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