Occupy Hermeneutics

Occupy Hermeneutics December 6, 2011

Mercy, this is why Christian Smith had to write The Bible Made Impossible.

By Tony Perkins, Special to CNN

(CNN) One of the last instructions Jesus gave his disciples was “Occupy till I come.”

As Jesus was about to enter Jerusalem for the last time, just before his crucifixion, he was keenly aware that his disciples greatly desired and even anticipated that the kingdom of God was going to be established immediately on the earth.

The primary purpose of the parable, which appears in the Gospel of Luke, was to make clear to his disciples that the kingdom of God would not be physically established on the earth for some time and that, until then, they were being entrusted with certain responsibilities.

Jesus, depicted as a ruler in the story, would have to leave for a while as he traveled to a faraway place to receive authority to reign over the kingdom. In his absence, the disciples  depicted as servants  were to “occupy” until he returned.

Here’s the direct quote from Luke: “He called his ten servants, and gave to them ten minas, one mina each (a mina today would be worth around $225), and he then told them to ‘Occupy till I come.’ ” (Luke 19:13, King James Version)

But just what does Jesus’ order to occupy mean? Does it mean take over and trash public property, as the Occupy movement has? Does it mean engage in antisocial behavior while denouncing a political and economic system that grants one the right and luxury to choose to be unproductive?

No, the Greek term behind the old English translation literally means “be occupied with business.” As with all parables, Jesus uses a common activity such as fishing or farming to provide a word picture with a deeper spiritual meaning.

From a spiritual perspective, the mina in this parable represents the opportunity of life; each of us is given the same opportunity to build our lives, and each of us shares the same responsibility to invest our lives for the purpose of bringing a return and leaving a legacy. Jesus gave equal responsibility and opportunity to each of his 10 servants.

The fact that Jesus chose the free market system as the basis for this parable should not be overlooked. [There was no such thing, Tony.] When the nobleman returns, after being established as king  a stand-in for Jesus  he calls all his servants together to see what they had accomplished in his absence….

Instead, let’s let this parable tells what it does: use your King-appointed gifts for the kingdom of God.

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