For 2,000 Years, Catholics have Risked Their Lives Just to be at Mass

For 2,000 Years, Catholics have Risked Their Lives Just to be at Mass June 18, 2014

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3 responses to “For 2,000 Years, Catholics have Risked Their Lives Just to be at Mass”

  1. What I find amazing about the mass is that once you understand what is going on then the mass never gets boring, and you just feel like going more as time goes by.
    And by “understand what is going on” I mean once you realize when the consecration is, and what it means, when you understand the mass enough to know that there are several Eucharistic prayers, and you know, for example, whether you are in the Liturgy of the Word or in the Liturgy of the Eucharist – that sort of thing.

    Before I paid attention to what was going on, it was boring. I had no idea what was going on. Since I started to follow along in those little paperback books, (the “Order of the mass” part) the whole thing has become much more enriching.

    I tried to find a book on Amazon that would tell me what was going on at each stage of the mass. I found nothing, but vague books telling me all about the spiritual significance of the mass, or what it was supposed to represent. But nothing that told me what was actually going on, step by step. Until I started following along in the little paperback books.

    • Fred,

      If you are interested in learning more, I highly recommend The Mass: The Glory, the Mystery, the Tradition by Cardinal Donald Wuerl (Archbishop of Washington) and Mike Aquilina. It is a comprehensive discussion of the Mass and it’s meaning in clear and straightforward language, but not over simplified.

      Ray

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