Hugh Palmer on The Parable of the Nobleman – Luke 19

There are obvious traces of Jesus’ own story here. It is not an entirely original account, however. It is likely that it was loosely based on something that would be very familiar to Jesus’ hearers. Herod had gone to Rome to persuade the emperor to make him King. The Jews had send a delegation to protest. He had returned as king and massacred hundreds at the first Passover. This is a tale with lessons for the return of the King.

1. How to be a looser in the long run: Be a rebel in the short run. There are still a few people are polite about Christianity, trying to stay on the fence. Some wouldn’t dream of actively rejecting Christ, but don’t want to follow him. Times have changed and there is an aggression about the new atheists. Jesus will be declared and revealed as king, and although he will not be an evil dictator, his enemies will not be forgotten. To want Jesus as our king is not to be out of date but its to be ahead of the times.

2. When wise investors get their bonus. Eternal rewards are available from Jesus. The benefits are out of all proportion ot the effort and will inolve greater responsibility, not being bored with nothing to do. The “well done” will be the greatest reward.

3. Why playing safe is bad business. The man hadn’t been asked to play it safe, he had been told to put it to work. If you don’t use it you loose it. Jesus wasn’t a hard man. He left heaven to die for us. This is not a gospel to play safe with.. One day we will be asked to give account for what we did with it.

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