What Christians know about each other

Justin Taylor posts a startling quotation from Dietrich Bonhoeffer from Life Together, about what a Christian “who lives beneath the cross of Jesus” knows about sin, himself, and other sinners.   And how this knowledge of the human heart, as revealed by the Cross, goes deeper than that of any psychologist. [Read more...]

Novels every Christian should consider reading

I previously blogged about my contribution–a review of Huckleberry Finn–to a blog series that Justin Taylor is running on “novels every Christian should consider reading.”  I urge you to read the whole series, which includes different Christians’ take on classic novels like Tom Jones, entertaining reads like Patrick O’Brian’s sea sagas, and finds that I, for one, hadn’t heard of but am now anxious to read, like Mark Helprin’s Soldier of the Great War.

And now I turn the topic over to you.  What do you think are some novels every Christian should consider reading?

Obama vows to “destroy” ISIS

President Obama announced that the United States would launch a “relentless” air campaign, co-ordinated with allied forces on the ground (though not including American ground troops) to “destroy” the Islamic State/ISIS/ISIL. [Read more...]

Should Christianity try to be “cool”?

Brett McCracken, author of Hipster Christianity,  argues that there are intrinsic contradictions inherent in the various attempts to make Christianity “cool.”  See what he says after the jump, whereupon I offer some thoughts on my own on the efforts to adapt Christianity to one culture or another and offer a modest proposal. [Read more...]

My take on “Huckleberry Finn”

Justin Taylor, the publisher at Crossway and a notable blogger, is running a series on “novels that every Christian should consider reading.”  He asked me to write about the great American novel that is Huckleberry Finn.  Mark Twain fan that I am, I was glad to do so. [Read more...]

The mother of all attack ads

I was 12 years old when I watched Lyndon Johnson’s campaign ad that showed a little girl picking daisies followed by the mushroom cloud of a nuclear blast.  Even at the time, I understood the message:  Don’t vote for that extremist Barry Goldwater!  He will start a nuclear war!

Yes, the ad, if you thought about it was utterably lame (a little girl? daisies?), but it had to have contributed to LBJ’s landslide victory.  Drew Babb analyzes the political commercial, which aired as a paid advertisement one time only on September 7, 1964 (after that, it was endlessly re-run by the three networks who covered the ad itself as a piece of news).  He calls it the “mother of all attack ads.” [Read more...]


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