By Timothy Askew; reprinted from Inc. with the kind permission of Timothy Askew. Johnny Depp once said: “Trips to the dentist; I like to postpone that kind of thing.” I was stuck in the dentist’s chair for two and a half hours last Tuesday. This was perfect for a rainy spring day in New York. I came in depressed and anxious about business and some personal issues. After hearing the dentist’s usual homily on my dental sins (poor brushing, insufficient… Read more

I started reading this recent article from The New Atlantis thinking that it would be mostly about the technology of why we no longer see the stars. It turned out to be as much about the philosophy, even the spirituality, of why: “We used to look up in the sky and wonder at our place in the stars,” Matthew McConaughey’s character says near the beginning of the 2014 movie Interstellar. “Now we just look down and worry about our place in the… Read more

Struggling congregations tend to chase after popular strategies rather than do what Jesus commanded — make disciples, says the United Methodist pastor of a replanted church in Dallas. Read more

I found these tips from Lifehacker pretty helpful, since all of my jobs except for being an Episcopal priest require constant online presence. (And that one requires more online presence than you might think.) Lifehacker sez: Many jobs in the contemporary workplace actually require that you’re online all the time, constantly connected to your coworkers—and to a mind-boggling ocean of distractions. Here’s how to stay focused. When you do all of your work online—especially if you work from home—it’s tempting… Read more

This is the message of a recent blog post by Amy Laura Hall of Duke Divinity School, and of her book Conceiving Parenthood. (The book has been around for a while, but the blog post is commemorating its release into paperback). I wish this book were not so obviously relevant. I wish that people in the US were not listening in on yet another conversation about spending money on public schools and children’s lunches, on Head Start (a federal pre-school program) and… Read more

Are there any who are devout lovers of God? Let them enjoy this beautiful bright festival! Are there any who are grateful servants? Let them rejoice and enter into the joy of their Lord! Are there any weary with fasting? Let them now receive their wages! If any have toiled from the first hour, let them receive their due reward; If any have come after the third hour, let him with gratitude join in the Feast! And he that arrived… Read more

1 O sacred head, sore wounded, Defiled and put to scorn; O kingly head, surrounded With mocking crown of thorn: What sorrow mars Thy grandeur? Can death Thy bloom deflow’r? O countenance whose splendor The hosts of heav’en adore! 2 Thy beauty, long desired, Hath vanished from our sight; Thy pow’r is all expired, And quenched the light of light. Ah me! for whom Thou diest, Hide not so far Thy grace: Show me, O Love most highest, The brightness… Read more

1 Ah, holy Jesus, how hast thou offended, that we to judge thee have in hate pretended? By foes derided, by thine own rejected, O most afflicted! 2 Who was the guilty? Who brought this upon thee? Alas, my treason, Jesus, hath undone thee! ‘Twas I, Lord Jesus, I it was denied thee; I crucified thee. 3 Lo, the Good Shepherd for the sheep is offered; the slave hath sinned, and the Son hath suffered. For our atonement, while we… Read more

Still, even though we’re no longer referring to “lady doctors” or to “poetesses” and “authoresses,” says the BBC: Neanderthalic behaviour such as calling a woman “honey” or “baby” is as out of fashion as cave paintings. Particularly in the workplace, certain kinds of sexist language are simply no longer accepted. But there’s mounting evidence, anecdotal and scientific, that gender-propelled language and attitudes are still common in many places of employment. Gendered words are thrown around constantly. In performance reviews, women… Read more

What do you do when you’re called shrill, hysterical or bossy? The executive director of the Massachusetts Council of Churches responds by feeling deeply and sharing her pain. Reprinted from Faith and Leadership. Christians say awful things to one another. I wish I hadn’t had to learn this as the leader of a Christian institution. In my ministry, I’ve been called all sorts of cruel things: shrill, hysterical, bossy, manipulative, emotionally unstable. I’ve been likened to farm animals. I’ve had… Read more

Follow Us!



Browse Our Archives