God’s into art, not empires

In seminary, several decades ago, I had a good friend named Christ (rhymes with “wrist”) John Otto. He’s written posts on this blog before about how artists need to be the foremost culture-shapers of our time (here and here). We’ve taken different denominational and vocational paths over the decades, but two things are true of [Read More…]

Retail workers are people too

A while ago, I made a commitment to always greet and thank retail workers in whatever situation I encountered them (Starbucks, Walmart, or the corner doughnut shop. Actually, I don’t live near a corner doughnut shop anymore….more’s the pity.) I have renewed this commitment after I read this penetrating and depressing article about what it’s [Read More…]

Is the utopian workplace just a ploy to keep us all at work?

Today’s long read is from Aeon, and asks a provocative question about whether “tech campuses” and the like are really in all of our best interests. After talking about Google’s new Mountain View campus, author Benjamin Naddaff-Hafrey wonders: Such offices symbolise not just the future of work in the public mind, but also a new, utopian age [Read More…]

Vocation and Community on #ValentinesDay

The Church, As it is The Body of Christ Small as a mustard seed and just as fair, The seeds of faith are planted in the night, Seeking their tiny space of warmth and light, Asking but room to grow and prosper there. Small as the seeds of faith, the hope of trust Once-wounded reaches [Read More…]

A Leap Into Social Entrepreneurship

…as detailed over at Seedbed by Josh Moon. I heard his presentation to The Asbury Project a couple of years ago, and I commend his efforts: If you are thinking you are way too unprepared to be a social entrepreneur, then we will get along quite well. Before my sophomore year in college I had no [Read More…]

Do long hours make you less productive?

CNBC reported a bit ago that working more than 50 hours a week may not be doing you, or your employer, any favors: Nearly half of U.S. workers say they routinely put in more than 50 hours on the job each week, often without overtime pay. But employers should probably start politely declining the “free” [Read More…]