Breakfast Links for 12/24/12 – Gun Control Fantasies; Jesus and the ‘God-button’; Tebow and the Patience of Job

BREAKFAST LINKS 12/24/12:

Johnnie Moore, Patheos/Philosophical Fragments: “We must let what we know about God compensate for what we don’t understand about Him. While we think we need answers, what we actually need is God Himself.”

Stephen Greenhut, Orange County Register: Utopian Fantasies of Gun Control Advocates

J. E. Dyer, Patheos/The Optimistic Christian: “What a beginning it was, those twenty centuries ago, when Jesus came as a newborn baby to live among us. The world then was a darker place for the average person: brutal, dangerous, ignorant, and unjust. Jesus didn’t need to experience that, but he came and lived with it for a time.”

Frida Gritis, CNN Opinion: What Obama Can Learn from Lincoln

Peter Enns, Patheos/Peter Enns: “The compost pile analogy reminds me that focusing our gaze on the Bible is like looking expectantly at the compost pile rather than the fragrant rose or luscious watermelon that is waiting to grow up out of the ground.”

Stephen Douglas Wilson, Baptist Press: About Those Shepherds…

Ben Witherington, Patheos/The Bible and Culture: “It means, I take it, that while Jesus had a God button, and he could have pushed it when he got in a difficult situation, he refused to do so because it would have meant the end of his living a truly human life with all its inherent limitations.”

Joseph Bottum, Washington Times: Tim Tebow and the Patience of Job

Richard Dahlstrom, Patheos/Fibonacci Faith: “Light is appreciated in proportion to the darkness of the journey.”

Peter Wehner, Patheos/Philosophical Fragments: James Dobson’s Callous Theology

 

What we know about God is greater than what we don’t know;  What Jesus changed; The Bible is like a compost heap; Jesus’ Incarnation and the God Button;  Light, Darkness and the Journey; Fantasies of gun-control advocates; What Obama can learn from Lincoln; About those shepherds; Tim Tebow and Job are alike; Dobson and callous theology

 

About Timothy Dalrymple

Timothy Dalrymple was raised in non-denominational evangelical congregations in California. The son and grandson of ministers, as a young boy he spent far too many hours each night staring at the ceiling and pondering the afterlife.
 
In all his work he seeks a better understanding of why people do, and do not, come to faith, and researches and teaches in religion and science, faith and reason, theology and philosophy, the origins of atheism, Christology, and the religious transformations of suffering


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