Must be something out of kilter

Ed Darrell shared this video of Alfre Woodard channeling Sojourner Truth:

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Terrific presentation of an amazing speech.

Happy to hear that Woodard will be playing Ouiser in an upcoming production of Steel Magnolias, where she’ll be joined in the cast by Queen Latifah, Phylicia Rashad, Condola Rashad, Jill Scott and Adepero Oduye. Cool.

Speaking of great performances, if you haven’t yet seen it, be sure not to miss 8, Dustin Lance Black’s play about the U.S. District Court case on California’s anti-marriage equality Proposition 8, which you can watch for free on YouTube.

The impressive cast lives up to its billing — including George Clooney, Martin Sheen, Brad Pitt, Jamie Lee Curtis, Christine Lahti, Jane Lynch, John C. Reilly, Chris Colfer, Matthew Morrison and Matt Bomer (or, as he’s known in this house, “the ridiculously good-looking guy from White Collar“). It’s a moving, forceful and unexpectedly funny bit of storytelling. I watched it a couple of weeks ago, and looking again just now was startled to realize I’d forgotten it’s a script-in-hand production.

Martin Sheen, who has been arrested dozens times in political protests, was apparently a bad influence on George Clooney (or, actually, a good influence).

* * * * * * * * *

Pop Matters interviews Mike Doughty:

Aside from working in the traditional write-an-album-and-tour-obsessively sense, Doughty has come to embrace Internet piracy and file-sharing as a means to spread the word on his solo endeavor.

“File-sharing is great for me. I will tell people that it makes sense for me as an artist that wants people to hear stuff and is trying to make a living. Please, if you don’t buy it steal it. If you buy it, give it to someone who can steal it,” he said.

You can hear his newer stuff at MikeDoughty.com.

* * * * * * * * *

Four years ago, after Super Tuesday made it clear that the Democrats were in for a long, two-candidate race for the nomination, I wrote that I was happy with the choices:

Magic Johnson is supporting Hillary Clinton. Kareem Abdul Jabaar, meanwhile, is supporting Barack Obama.

That’s the choice: Magic or Kareem.

It’s an understandably tough call, but I’m not complaining about the options.

Two good candidates and two exciting options. Either way, we were going to make history.

I’ve seen a great deal about the current long Republican primary contest, which features not just two, but four options for voters. I haven’t seen many people expressing the enthusiasm I felt four years ago. We had Magic and Kareem — they’ve got the Washington Generals.

* * * * * * * * *

New Hampshire’s massive 400-member House of Representatives is still way too big to fill with qualified people.

Homeowners associations are useful mainly for identifying the sort of people who can’t be trusted with power.

Diana Butler Bass says “awakening.”

John Shore says “reformation.”

Jo Hilder has published an e-book: God, You Can Take My Mental Illness — Just Not the Part Where You Speak to Me.

Tony Jones has published an ebook: A Better Atonement: Beyond the Depraved Doctrine of Original Sin.

The Snatchel Project is as whimsical and pointed as its name suggests.

The nefarious global conspiracy promoting the climate-change hoax continues to spread: The oceans are in on it. So are the maple trees of New England. And both Dakotas.

  • Lori

     

    A real musician doesn’t care how much money they make, they just want people to hear their music. 

    Where did people get this idea that “real” artists don’t want to eat?

  • Anonymous

    To be fair, that’s not a poll, it’s a psychology study.

    I’m not a psychologist, but on it’s face it seems pretty solid.  I have a small problem with some of the questions, but it’s sort of picky, and I doubt it would affect the results substantially.

    I haven’t read it it’s entirety, but I think the actual conclusions are a bit less inflammatory than Kristof and @aunursa:disqus think.  It isn’t just conservatives that liberals don’t understand – they also don’t understand other liberals.  By about the same amount that they don’t understand conservatives.  (My statistics are pretty rusty.)  And it isn’t strictly that they don’t understand them, it’s that they don’t reason along the same lines, so they see themselves as “opposed” to conservative and thus that conservatives must lie somewhere along the same axes.  For example, a conservative believes a soldier should always follow orders because that’s his duty.  A liberal believes a soldier should NOT follow disagreeable orders because it causes harm to people.   The liberal concludes that the reason that a conservative would conclude a soldier should always follow orders is because he thinks hurting people is okay, not because he thinks that following orders is the greater moral good over not hurting people – this informs his mental picture of a conservative.  The conservative understand that you shouldn’t hurt people – so can guess that the liberals think this is the reason a soldier shouldn’t always follow orders, he just ranks it below the solider doing his duty at all time.

    That’s actually the question I have a problem with from the study, and I think it’s the main problem with the methodology.  There’s really no room for situational ethics there – and I think most liberals would agree that soldiers should follow all lawful orders, not just orders they agree with with.  (Which is how the question is phrased.) Most of the questions with that sort of problem would play the liberals weak side while playing to the conservative strength.  Most of the liberals I know can (and do) construct fairly elaborate scenarios where people’s actions are justified no matter how awful they seem to be at first.

    The other, separate issue is that my understanding of conservatism and conservatives has no bearing whatsoever on how wrong they are.  Particularly on economic issue, conservative philosophy is one giant ass counter-factual.  It doesn’t matter how much I think it hurts people, or how much they claim it’s a moral hazard, subtracting demand from the economy by canceling UI and food stamps will cause the economy to contract.  Say what you want Rick Santorum being a monster (I will) at least he’s honest about not caring what happens to the unemployed.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_NR2MMC4EJXJWJMLH6IF457XL64 Alex B

    I agree with this and you can see very clear examples of it even on this very site. Conservatives don’t like the birth control mandate because they’re misogynists. While it’s true that there is some underlying societal misogyny contributing to that view, pigs will fly out of my ass at warp 10 before you’ll get an actual conservative to admit that.

  • Anonymous

    I wrote a few points and then found some polls that directly contradicted two of my points.  Since there is no option to delete a comment (Thanks Discus!), I deleted the contents of my comments.  Sorry for any confusion.

  • Anonymous

    Please learn the difference between an opinion poll and a study.

  • Anonymous

    I think In-N-Out shouln’t care how much money they make, they should just want people to eat their burgers.

    I think dentists shouldn’t care how much money they make, they should just want people to have nice looking teeth.

    I think the people who stack the shelves at Target shouldn’t care how much money they make, they should just want the store shelves to be neat and tidy.

    I think police officers shouldn’t care how much money they make, they should just want the rest of us to be safe in our communities.

    I think my landlady shouldn’t care how much money she makes, she should just want me to have a roof over my head.

    Screw you, and the internet you rode in on.

  • Anonymous

    Ron Paul’s supporters are like circumcision opponents: they are small in number but highly enthusiastic.  I remember 2008 online polls on conservative websites that were spammed by Paul’s supporters to give the illusion that he had a higher level support than he really had.

  • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

    It’s a “study” that was conducted like a poll. 

    Why do you like polls so much?

  • Anonymous

     Oh, I understand!  No worries, and thank you for the explanation, not only for that but for my questions! ^_^

  • Anonymous

    “The race is officially over if Romney wins in Santorum’s home state.”

    The will be “officially” over with the completion of the last primary election and caucus.  The race will be mathematically over when Romney has a majority of delegates committed to vote for him on the first ballot.  The race has been de facto over, in the sense that only some very low probability combination of events could lead to any result other than a Romney nomination, for some weeks now.

  • Anonymous

    Conservatives don’t like the birth control mandate because they’re misogynists.

    This is a perfect example of a situation in which a poll comes in handy.  Based on a recent CBS News/New York Times survey, those who argue that conservatives who oppose the contraception mandate are misogynists must conclude that 39% of Democrats, 57% of independents, and 53% of women are misogynists.  Or attempt to give a gobbledygook explanation for significant opposition other demographic groups.

  • Anonymous

    I like to know what other people think.  I like to know what people in general think.  I like to know what to expect in predictions of upcoming elections.  I like to know whether certain views on certain issues are in the mainstream or in the extreme.  I like to know how views compare among different demographics.

  • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

    Misogynists don’t admit they’re misogynists and racists don’t admit that they’re racists. Conservatives tie themselves up in knots to pretend that the reasons they believe certain unsupportable things is because of some practical or moral matter (“moral” nearly always translating as “what non-cis non-straight non-white non-males choose to do sexually.”) Humanity has a natural tendency to do this. Education and critical thinking can counteract it.

    That study takes what people say about themselves at face value and phrases complex questions in ways that force people into yes or no answers. 

  • Anonymous

    I stand corrected.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    How do the Republicans vote for their Presidential candidates? If by delegates then I’m assuming that the delegates have probably already plumped one way or another for their preferred candidate and the rest of the sorry-assed business is just a big dog and pony show to convince the world at large that there’s a race of ideas at all*.

    * as opposed to all of them basically being on the same page about a tax cut curing everything.

  • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

    You will get none of those things from polls.

    Look up “Penn & Teller polls are bullshit.”

  • Lori

     

    This is a perfect example of a situation in which a poll comes in
    handy.  Based on a recent CBS News/New York Times survey, those who
    argue that conservatives who oppose the contraception mandate are
    misogynists — must conclude that 39% of Democrats, 57% of independents,
    and 53% of women are misogynists.  Or attempt to give a
    gobbledygook explanation for significant opposition to the mandate among
    these other demographic groups.  

    1) I’m not sure where you got the idea that Democrats, Independents and women can’t be misogynists, or at least heavily influenced by misogyny.

    2) Did the poll include any questions that would be useful in determining if the people being polled actually understood the mandate? Because if not then the numbers are pretty meaningless. That’s not gobbledygook.

  • http://stealingcommas.blogspot.com/ chris the cynic

    At the convention there will be a bunch of delegates who will vote for the nominee.  A majority is required for one to become the nominee.  The delegates a chosen in various ways.  Some of them are pledged to support a specific candidate, some are not.  How pledged delegates are chosen varies from state to state.

    Some states are winner take all, some are proportional, some are some combination of the two, some are winner take all by congressional district, some are even more confusing.

    A big part of what Ron Paul is doing takes place after the popular vote has been cast.  He’s trying to maximize the amount of delegates that he gets via working during the delegate selection process.  In at least one state his supporters teamed up with Romney supporters against Santorum supporters during that part of the process meaning that Santorum is going to end up with fewer delegates than you would expect based on the votes cast.

    Most of the reporting on the delegate numbers is on estimates, and those estimates probably don’t take into account the stuff I mentioned in the previous paragraph.

    There are even more complexities in the process, but I think that basically covers most of it.

    When the primaries and caucuses and such are all over, a bunch of delegates will have been selected, they will then go to Tampa where they’ll vote on who gets to be the Republican nominee.  Before the most recent primary there was a chance that Santorum could be that person, but he’s really blown his chance to change things, which means that even if Romney doesn’t have a majority of delegates pledged to him when the convention starts, he’s still likely to be chosen.  And more likely than not he will have a majority when the convention starts.

  • Anonymous

     

    as opposed to all of them basically being on the same page about a tax cut for the rich curing everything.

    Fixed that for you. We saw with the payroll tax fight that they’re against tax cuts that aren’t targeted narrowly towards the fifth quintile.

  • Anonymous

    I enjoy Penn & Teller, but they are not the final authority on any subject.

  • Anonymous

    1) I don’t see any disagreement between your response and my comment.

    2) Did I hear you correctly?  Are you suggesting that opposition to the mandate expressed by Republicans is based on their understanding of the issue — and therefore can be attributed to their misogyny; while the opposition expressed by Democrats, independents, and women* is based on their lack of understanding of the issue?  The idea that Republicans are better informed on the issue than Democrats is not what I would have expected from you.  ;-)

    * For anyone needing clarification, the “women” demographic includes Democrats, Republicans, and independents; therefore there is a large overlap.

    At any rate, here is the wording of the questions that deal with this subject:

    73. Do you think health insurance plans for all employees should have to cover the full cost of birth control for their female employees, or should employers be allowed to opt out of covering that based on religious or moral objections?
    * Cover birth control
    * Allowed to opt out
    * Depends
    * Don’t know/no answer
     
    74. What about for religiously affiliated employers, such as a hospital or university? Do you think their health insurance plans for all employees should have to cover the full cost of birth control for their female employees, or should they be allowed to opt out of covering that based on religious or moral objections?
    * Cover birth control
    * Allowed to opt out
    * Depends
    * Don’t know/no answer
     
    76. Do you think the debate on this issue is more about religious freedom or more about women’s health and their rights?
    * Religious freedom
    * Women’s health/rights
    * Both
    * Don’t know/no answer

  • Lori

     

    2) Did I hear you correctly?  Are you suggesting that opposition to the
    mandate expressed by Republicans is based on their understanding of the
    issue — and therefore can be attributed to their misogyny; while the
    opposition expressed by Democrats, independents, and women* is based on
    their lack of understanding of the issue?  The idea that Republicans are
    better informed on the issue than Democrats is not what I would have
    expected from you.  ;-)  

    Don’t try to be cute. It doesn’t become you.

    Do you think the debate on this issue is more about religious freedom or more about women’s health and their rights? 

    Anyone who answered religious freedom is badly enough informed about the issue that their answers to the rest of the questions is of dubious worth.

  • Anonymous

    “I was talking about the difference between the numbers Romney and Santorum get in those polls.”

    I think a big factor is where the 2.5% of extra support for Romney comes from. Santorum is more popular than Romney in a bunch of states that either of them would win anyway. And Romney is more popular than Santorum in a bunch of states that neither can win. The question is who has a better chance against Obama for those other 140 or so electoral votes. Purple Strategies, which tracks the 12 likeliest swing states, just released their March numbers:

    President Obama maintains a steady advantage against both Republican challengers in the key swing states that will determine the 2012 general election. He currently leads Romney by 4 points (48% to 44%) and holds a majority against Rick Santorum (50% to 42%).

    There’s a long way till this election, but even with his very low approval ratings- which have nowhere to go but up- Romney is within striking distance.

    Interestingly, Santorum and Romney seem to compete equally well in the Midwest and Western swing states, while Romney matches up better against the President in the Heartland and Southern swing states.

    http://www.purplestrategies.com/wp-content/uploads/MarchPurplePoll12.pdf 

  • Rissa

    While I prefer Alice Walker’s recitation by a teeny margin, Alfre Woodard does a phenomenal job too. Riveting.

  • Tricksterson

    He likes the polls that tell him what he wants to hear.  In that he’s little different from anyone else.

  • Tricksterson

    You’re right.  That would be George Carlin.

  • P J Evans

    Rasmussen, I take it. Which has a well-known bias in favor of Republicans. (There are other polls which are less biased.) Try this:

    Quinnipiac. March 13-18. Virginia RVs. ±3.1%. (Feb results.)

        Obama: 50 (47)
        Romney: 42 (43)

        Mitt Romney Net Favorability:
        Oct 2011: +9 (38/29)
        Dec 2011: +10 (37/27)
        Feb 2012: +4 (43/39)
        Mar 2012: -7 (36/43)

        President Obama Net Favorability:
        Oct 2011: -4 (45/49)
        Dec 2011: -2 (45/47)
        Feb 2012: +3 (50/47)
        Mar 2012: +7 (51/44)

  • P J Evans

    His supporters have been trying to get delegates by, practically speaking, trying to take over party meetings and force them to give delegates to Paul. This has gotten them thrown out of a number of meetings, and threatened with arrest. (Great way to convince people to support your candidate, yes?)

  • Tricksterson

    Who’s supporters, Paul’s or Santorum’s?

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Patrick-McGraw/100001988854074 Patrick McGraw

     

    We saw with the payroll tax fight that they’re against tax cuts that aren’t targeted narrowly towards the fifth quintile.

    Considering that these are largely the people who made a big deal out of promising to Never Raise Any Taxes Ever, and explicitly called allowing tax cuts to expire “raising taxes,” I think this tells us everything we need to know about them.

  • P J Evans

    Paul’s, in all the instances I’ve heard of.


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