The weird science of Light

The weird science of Light June 18, 2012

More mind-blowing discoveries from quantum physics:

In the quantum optical laboratories at the Niels Bohr Institute, researchers have conducted experiments that show that light breaks with the classical physical principles. The studies show that light can have both an electrical and a magnetic field, but not at the same time. That is to say, light has quantum mechanical properties.

via Breaking the limits of classical physics.

 

"That God has not revealed all of his knowledge to us is obvious. As is ..."

The Problem with Evangelical Vows of ..."
"He doesn't reveal it at all. I'm saying that God does not reveal everything to ..."

The Problem with Evangelical Vows of ..."
"I don't think 20 is a very typical age for getting married these days. Which ..."

The Problem with Evangelical Vows of ..."
"If you consider "But that doesn't mean that God only wants us to marry one ..."

The Problem with Evangelical Vows of ..."

Browse Our Archives

Follow Us!


TRENDING AT PATHEOS Evangelical
What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • Pastor Spomer

    Quantum physics is underaprieciated in theology and philosophy circles. People still speak as though we were in a Newtonian world.

  • Pastor Spomer

    Quantum physics is underaprieciated in theology and philosophy circles. People still speak as though we were in a Newtonian world.

  • mikeb

    I find it fascinating that they keep finding infinitely smaller particles. The deeper we look the more we find.

  • mikeb

    I find it fascinating that they keep finding infinitely smaller particles. The deeper we look the more we find.

  • Ideas certainly have these aspects.

  • Ideas certainly have these aspects.

  • I don’t have a subscription to JPL, so I can’t read the actual source article (not that I’m sure I’d understand it), but I can’t figure out what the news is here. Surely it’s not news that “light has quantum mechanical properties” — we’ve known that for, what, 50 years? What am I missing here?

  • I don’t have a subscription to JPL, so I can’t read the actual source article (not that I’m sure I’d understand it), but I can’t figure out what the news is here. Surely it’s not news that “light has quantum mechanical properties” — we’ve known that for, what, 50 years? What am I missing here?

  • Pastor Spomer

    Please excuses my typos. I’m using my Father’s day gift, iPad. Anybody know how these things work? I grew up on windows.

  • Pastor Spomer

    Please excuses my typos. I’m using my Father’s day gift, iPad. Anybody know how these things work? I grew up on windows.

  • fws

    pastor spomer @ 5

    you and me both. heeeeelppp.

  • fws

    pastor spomer @ 5

    you and me both. heeeeelppp.

  • I have access to the article t work, but I think they linked the wrong one. I was wondering the same thing, Todd.

  • I have access to the article t work, but I think they linked the wrong one. I was wondering the same thing, Todd.

  • I’m still waiting for warp drive to be discovered.

  • I’m still waiting for warp drive to be discovered.

  • Dust

    Mike at 8…..thanks, that cleared up everything 🙂

  • Dust

    Mike at 8…..thanks, that cleared up everything 🙂

  • Clear as mud, I assume. At least to me it is.

  • Clear as mud, I assume. At least to me it is.

  • Mike (@11), best I could tell, they had discovered a method by which the (long-known) quantum properties of light could be observed at a non-quantum level. Something like that. And the quantum property in question was the inability to know both position and momentum at the same time (as told us by the oft-misunderstood — including by me — Heisenberg uncertainty principle).

    Let me try again. Since I was in high school 20 years ago (and likely well before that), quantum physics has said that you can’t know both the position and momentum of something simultaneously. That’s Heisenberg. And quantum physics has been a very useful model in understanding and predicting how things work. But (here I’m speculating a bit), it would seem that never before had this particular theory from quantum had been observed at the “classical” level.

  • Mike (@11), best I could tell, they had discovered a method by which the (long-known) quantum properties of light could be observed at a non-quantum level. Something like that. And the quantum property in question was the inability to know both position and momentum at the same time (as told us by the oft-misunderstood — including by me — Heisenberg uncertainty principle).

    Let me try again. Since I was in high school 20 years ago (and likely well before that), quantum physics has said that you can’t know both the position and momentum of something simultaneously. That’s Heisenberg. And quantum physics has been a very useful model in understanding and predicting how things work. But (here I’m speculating a bit), it would seem that never before had this particular theory from quantum had been observed at the “classical” level.