ReligionProf Podcast with Ruth Hayhoe

ReligionProf Podcast with Ruth Hayhoe November 20, 2019

In the ReligionProf Podcast episode embedded above, I talk to Prof. Ruth Hayhoe, a specialist in comparative education who was recently involved in the production of a book in the field of biblical studies. The backstory is that Ruth is the sister of Suzanne McCarthy, whose writings on her blog I mentioned and linked to on my own blog often. Suzanne sadly died from cancer while working on a book about gender bias in Bible translation, and her sister Ruth, in collaboration with several other family members, made sure it was published. It is now available from Wipf & Stock under the title Valiant or Virtuous? Gender Bias in Bible Translation. In the podcast you can hear more about this story.

Other blogs have talked about the book:

announcement: Suzanne McCarthy’s book

Marg Mowczko reviews “Valiant or Virtuous?” by Suzanne McCarthy

Valiant or Virtuous? by Suzanne McCarthy

Suzanne’s blogs were Suzanne’s Bookshelf and then also the BLT blog

There are obituaries in The Globe and Mail and from Mount Pleasant Group

Tributes appeared on blogs and discussion boards, including Kristen Rosser’s moving account as well as the following:

Suzanne Ethelwyn McCarthy, 1955-2015

iBiblio

Also related to this, Marg Mowczko (who provides one of the endorsements on the book) wrote about texts sometimes used to diminish women. Claude Montonini plans to explore some of those texts further on his own blog:

Obscure Texts Sometimes Used to Diminish Women

While the focus of this podcast is Suzanne’s book, I also want to highlight Ruth’s own work as a scholar. Here are three examples from among them: China Through the Lens of Comparative Education (Routledge: World Library of Educationalists, 2015). There is also a podcast where the author is interviewed about the book. Second, a co-edited book, just out in 2018, Religion and Education: Comparative and International Perspectives (Oxford: Symposium books, 2018). Third, Canadian Universities in China’s Transformation: An Untold Story (Montreal: McGill Queens University Press, 2016). A friend is active in the field of comparative education, and teaching in the core about other cultures and nations I often wish I had time to read more widely about the educational approaches and systems in other countries. From my experience of studying in the U.K. and teaching in Romania, I am aware of how significant the differences can be and how they are shaped by and in turn shape a society’s values.

Now, back to the subject of Suzanne’s wonderful book, here are some more links related to ancient and modern women:

For Women In Church, Not Nearly Enough Has Changed

Women Church Leaders?

Women Who Can’t Be Pastors Still Have Immense Power in Conservative Churches

What If Biblical Womanhood Isn’t Biblical?

From the Biblical ‘Woman on Fire’ to Female Kurdish Fighters: The Women Who Mama Up by Tallessyn Zawn Grenfell-Lee

Imagining Motherhood and the Past

The danger of the admonition that wives submit to husbands in modern society

Is it a Sin for Women to Wear Pants?

There has been a lot related to remarks by John MacArthur:

Beth Moore, Don’t Go Home

We’re Not Going Home

Hey, John MacArthur. You have a culture. It’s called white (Christian) patriarchy.

Sunday Meditations: John MacArthur Is Not Very Smart

Cokesbury to remove John MacArthur books after remarks on women, race, and intersectionality

Southern Baptist Leader Admits Complementarianism Can Lead to Abuse of Women

God: He, She, or Both?

Christian Preacher: Beth Moore, a Well-Known Bible Teacher, Needs to “Go Home”

Unjust judge, shameless widow (Luke 18)

What’s a “Biblical” Marriage?

ERA—Equal Rights for Women—in the US: Has Our Time Finally Come? by Carol P. Christ

Inside Higher Ed had articles on Karen Swallow’s departure from Liberty University and on Women’s Study professors at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary.

Letter to the Editor: Experienced Clergy Women Need Not Apply

Racism and Patriarchy—Twin Demons of Abuse

Mary and Marginalizing Women (by Kelly Edmiston)

Hazing Women

David Raped Bathsheba, and Why That Matters

Why Are So Many Evangelicals Okay with David Being a Murderer, But Not a Rapist?

The Billy Graham Rule

Women in the Seminary Classroom

Pastor Finds Feminism in Prodigal Son Story

An Open Letter to John MacArthur (re: Beth Moore)

Go Home or At Home?

Garry Wills on Patriarchy and the Discrimination of Women in the Academy

Does Jerry Falwell Jr. Care That He Just Lost a Star Faculty Member?

Why women were singled out in the Salem Witch Trials

More distantly related to the topic is the review of a book about the Sufi mystic Rabi’a that appeared recently in Reading Religion. And finally, from N. T. Wright:

 


Browse Our Archives

Follow Us!


TRENDING AT PATHEOS Progressive Christian
What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • John MacDonald

    I’m about half way through the podcast, and it’s a really interesting account of transitioning from years of blogging to fifteen chapters of a book that were very important for the author. It made me think of the motivations behind my own blog. Virtually all Philosophy being taught today is in the Analytic tradition, and I found coming up in the Continental tradition that the Continental thinkers were being portrayed as kind of silly (eg, Nietzsche’s Eternal Recurrence as an idiosyncratic cosmological speculation). It was only after extensive study that I came to believe the Continental tradition had rich insights into the human condition, and so that was one of the emphases of my blog. So, I think that while Philosophy will probably always mainly be Analytic, perhaps one day a rigorous interpretation of the Continental tradition will be included along side of it!

    • John MacDonald

      I was lucky to have brilliant professors and scholars of the Continental tradition!

      • John MacDonald

        One thing Dr. McGrath mentioned in this podcast is his books. I hope everyone has “The Burial of Jesus.” It’s really interesting and only 2 1/2 dollars on Kindle!