“The Latin Mass appears to be alive and well”

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That’s the assessment from The St. Louis Post-Dispatch: 

When Pope Francis was first elected, he appeared to the crowd in St. Peter’s Square without the short, red velvet cape known as a mozzetta. Some Roman Catholics immediately cried foul, worried that the pope’s decision to forgo the more formal wear signaled a threat to traditional Catholic worship.

Specifically, they fretted over the fate of the old Latin Mass, now in the hands of a papacy that seemed to shrug off pomp and circumstance.

But more than one year into Francis’ reign, the Tridentine Mass, as it is sometimes called, appears to be alive and well. Decades after the Roman Catholic Church moved away from celebrating Mass in Latin, a throwback movement is growing, in many cases with the young leading the charge.

On Tuesday, four men were ordained into the priesthood at St. Francis de Sales Oratory, the neo-Gothic church in south St. Louis known for practicing the Latin liturgy, for its soaring 300-foot steeple and for its listing on the National Registry of Historic Places.

The Mass marked only the second time members of the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest have been ordained in the United States. The religious community, founded in Africa in 1990, regularly celebrates the old-style Mass, or the extraordinary form of the Roman Rite, as Pope Benedict XVI referred to it.

The last set of U.S. ordinations to the institute was celebrated in 2007 and involved only two deacons. This year’s group was larger, with four men welcomed into the priesthood. Four other men were ordained earlier this year in Italy, where the institute is based.

Former St. Louis Archbishop Raymond Burke, one of the more devoted supporters of the old Latin rite among U.S. bishops, came in from Rome to lead the ordinations.

Mary Kraychy, with the Coalition in Support of Ecclesia Dei, a nonprofit based in Glenview, Ill., that promotes the Latin Mass, says she’s seen a slow but steady rise in the practice, with more than 400 churches offering the liturgy today. The organization sells missals that display the Latin text of the Mass alongside the English translation.

Kraychy describes it as a “youth movement,” with much of the enthusiasm for the rite espoused by those who are too young to remember the Second Vatican Council. In 1969, Pope Paul VI declared that the church should perform Mass in the native language of parishioners, which led to the Tridentine Mass’ being largely replaced.

Read the rest. 


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