Weekly Meanderings

Skating in Millennium Park:
MillPk.jpgGood reminder from CNN about the sleep needs of teenagers.

Before I forget, I have to say that I’m liking that little mouse the ads have for the Tale of Despereaux … a kind of reepicheep thing for me.

Excellent discussion of the gospel by Tim Keller and Dave Dunbar addresses the question about “missional.” Speaking of which …. David Fitch announces a non/conference on missional.

Andy Rowell chimes in on the missional vs. attractional conversation provoked at Out of Ur blog when Alan Hirsch claimed the culture base of attractional churches is shrinking and I challenged Hirsch for numbers — thanks to Andy. Hirsch and Fitch believe in the missional model, and they’re best off arguing it theologically instead of by appealing to supposed population trends. I confess here and everywhere that their theology is very close to mine.

Barn.jpgRick Warren, in an interview with Steven Waldman, candidly reveals some of his doubts. In that interview he speaks of the social gospel, and Paul Rauschenbush comes out defending his grandfather. I pushed back against some of what Paul said, perhaps too stiffly, so I wrote to Paul personally and we have had a brief, amiable exchange via e-mail. The dust-off between Warren and Rauschenbush is a microcosm of American religious history in the first half of the 20th Century.

Speaking of one given to gracious communication, here’s a wonderful tribute to Cardinal Avery Dulles. What would you do if your child decided to marry a “Sinner”? Ted Gossard‘s got a nice post as does Jim Martin about the integration of life and ministry. Did you see Eugene‘s reflections, via Korean laws on adultery, on the State’s role in enforcing morality? John Frye‘s got a nice pic of what Jesus’ first bed may have been like. John Stackhouse on the distinction of evangelical and conservative. Tamara Buchan‘s wondrous reminder about wasting time.

Dan knows music and Tim knows design.

Rob Merola’s family got a new addition, Edsel: here and here and here.

This overheard: “Welcome to Illinois, where our governors serve terms in office and then serve time in prison.”

But, of course, Rod says: “I will fight… and I have done nothing wrong.”

Winter1.jpg
1. We do lots of surveillance and GPS in Chicago, but now we’re doing it for Baby Jesus.
2. Tony Blair, his conversion to Catholicism, and his lack of speaking of it while in office.
3. Church attendance correlates with economic conditions.
4. “Under the old model, you dated a few times and, if you really liked the
person, you might consider having sex. Under the new model, you hook up
a few times and, if you really like the person, you might consider
going on a date.”
5. If you are interested in Christian Zionism, here’s a good review of a recent important book.
6. John Kennedy was the first President I remember and for some reason I’d like to see Caroline in the Senate.
7. The very thing Marianne Williamson says should happen (knock down walls) is what she isn’t permitting to happen. To be tolerant means to be tolerant even of those you don’t agree with. This contrasts with Obama himself. I quote: “During the course of the entire inaugural festivities, there are going to be a wide range of viewpoints that are presented and that’s how it should be, because  that’s what America’s about. That’s part of the magic of this country, is that we are diverse and noisy and opinionated. And, so, you know, that’s the spirit in which, you know, we have put together what I think will be a terrific inauguration. And that’s, hopefully, going to be a spirit that carries over into my administration.” From The Chicago Sun-Times by Lynne Sweet (Dec 18, 2008).

Sports:

SkiLib.jpgThe best thing about Bowl Season is having lots of books to read.

Kris and I don’t get to our beloved Independence Grove once the snows come, but this skier is holding on to our place until next Spring.

Steve Williams, caddie for Tiger, made some comments about Mickelson and just made the 2009 PGA Tour season more intense.

About Scot McKnight

Scot McKnight is a recognized authority on the New Testament, early Christianity, and the historical Jesus. McKnight, author of more than fifty books, is the Professor of New Testament at Northern Seminary in Lombard, IL.

  • Your Name

    Hello Scot. This is a question, not a comment. I thought I’d just be bold and go straight to a NT scholar whom I respect. I’m torn between getting the New Interpreter’s Study Bible and the new Harper Collins Study Bible. Each are in the NRSV and contain the apocrypha. I currently use the Oxford Annotated NRSV and am quite dissatisfied with it as it’s only concerned with text criticism, versus helping the reader to understand the historical background of the text, i.e. offering interpretations of symbols, etc. I’m looking for scholarly insights into the text, not a slicing and dicing of the text. So…which of the above two would you recommend? sincerely michael harris. mgharris2@gmail.com

  • Tim Gombis

    Steve Williams’s comment reminds of Michael Kinsley’s description of a political gaffe: When a politician accidentally speaks the truth. Everyone knows Mickelson and Woods can’t stand one another, but Williams actually said it. You’re exactly right, the Masters Tournament just got a new and intriguing story-line!

  • Scot McKnight

    “Your Name” (mgharris2),
    Thanks for your question. I have used both and of the two I’d use the New Interpreter’s … there are a number of reasons, but that would be another post.

  • Christine

    Me, too, Scot, regarding Caroline Kennedy.
    Merry Christmas, all, from snowy Portland. We just
    had five snow days (i.e., no school) and now have
    started winter break. Yeah!


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