Part 7: I Need Help

I wanted to update everyone on the fundraising. First off, I have to sincerely thank you all for your generosity. Since Part 1 of this series three weeks ago, you all have given $10,000! I’m serious … $10,000. I can’t believe it. I am so humbled I don’t know what to say, other than

Thank you.

Thank you.

From the core of my being, thank you.

Your overwhelming support has been out of this world, and it was honestly something I didn’t expect to happen. I guess there is power in asking?! This money has given The Marin Foundation a great start to 2010, and I do actually have hope for the future fundraising efforts! I will also be putting up a thermometer on the blog to track our funding so you all can stay as current as I do with everything.

Once again, my goal for individual giving is for 275 new people to give $15 per month: $180 total for the year! Outside of the one time giving this past month, I have had 5 new people commit to give $15 per month. Only 270 left! If you would be so generous to be one of those new 270 people, please email me at andrew@themarinfoundation.org to let me know so I can track everything. It’s only $180 per year … but if you have the capacity to give more, please, freely give more per month!

Here is a person directly affected by your small amount of money:

Alex:

Alex has been involved with The Marin Foundation for the past year—he was raised in a Christian home, went to Christian schools, tried for the past 10 years to ‘get rid of his same-sex attraction’ to no avail, and now he’s struggling to come to grips with the fact that he is a man with a same-sex attraction that is never going away; and he’s Christian. He’s been going to a conservative church that he has felt relatively safe within, and has enjoyed reconnecting with a faith he felt he could no longer be a part of. The other night he was visiting friends from college out of town and they all went to a gay bar. He ended up making out with a guy, went home with the guy and ended up getting violently raped (with no protection) by this guy.

Alex was freaking out because he realized his life might have just forever changed, against his will. And he couldn’t help but to solely blame himself. When he got back to Chicago he immediately got tested for HIV and the doctors put him on strong medication right away. Those next two weeks were sickening for Alex—the medicine was taking its toll on his body and his emotions of pain, guilt, uncertainty and betrayal were all running wild.

He didn’t feel as though he could tell his roommates what happened.

He didn’t feel as though he could tell his family what happened.

He didn’t feel as though he could tell his church what happened.

But the only entity he knew he could trust with his life to tell was The Marin Foundation. So he called me.

We were there for him, helped walk him through this process, and thank the Lord he has come up negative for HIV. So where is your mind with Alex?

Did he deserve what he got, regardless of how many times he said “no”?

Did he make a mistake in a struggle, or was he asking for something like this to happen to him?

Regardless of what your opinions, the knowledge that The Marin Foundation was the only place he knew he could trust is as important of a fact than any. This is all a small part of the wholistic Kingdom work The Marin Foundation is all about.

If not The Marin Foundation, than who would Alex have turned to?

It’s a haunting answer to think about …

Please give and be a regular monthly supporter, for as little as $15/month or $180 per year.

Much love.

www.themarinfoundation.org

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About Andrew Marin

Andrew Marin is President and Founder of The Marin Foundation (www.themarinfoundation.org). He is author of the award winning book Love Is an Orientation (2009), its interactive DVD curriculum (2011), and recently an academic ebook titled Our Last Option: How a New Approach to Civility can Save the Public Square (2013). Andrew is a regular contributor to a variety of media outlets and frequently lectures at universities around the world. Since 2010 Andrew has been asked by the United Nations to advise their various agencies on issues of bridging opposing worldviews, civic engagement, and theological aspects of reconciliation. For twelve years he lived in the LGBT Boystown neighborhood of Chicago, and is currently based St. Andrews, Scotland, where he is teaching and researching at the University of St. Andrews earning his PhD in Constructive Theology with a focus on the Theology of Culture. Andrew's research centers on the cultural, political, and religious dynamics of reconciliation. Andrew is married to Brenda, and you can find him elsewhere on Twitter (@Andrew_Marin), Facebook (AndrewMarin01), and Instagram (@andrewmarin1).

  • http://theformers.wordpress.com Debbie Thurman

    “If not The Marin Foundation, than who would Alex have turned to?
    It’s a haunting answer to think about …”

    Agreed. Thank you for being there for Alex. This ought to be a sobering opportunity for assessment for all Christians. Why can’t folks like Alex turn to their churches for support? That is exactly where the help ought to be coming from. Instead, many will silently (and some not-so-silently) blame Alex for what happened to him. Shame on all those who turn their backs on the ones we most need to love and help.

  • Sam

    Thank you for being the arms and hands of God to help one of His children. How frightening all of this must be for Alex!

    Maybe it’s on this site somewhere – but could you post a mailing address where we can send donations by check or money order?

  • Kevin

    Sam – You can send a check/money order to:

    The Marin Foundation
    700 W. Bittersweet Pl.
    Suite 208
    Chicago, IL 60613

  • pm

    While this isn’t a post about finances, it does relate back to
    the feelings one man felt and how he kept silent behind the door.
    How much pain must a person endure before they can speak
    of their terrible hurts inside? There was long ago a man who
    lost all of his hope to connect within a trusting circle of family and
    friends. We have some very cryptic insights tucked away in
    verses 33 and 34 of Job 31. It briefly touches on the melting away
    as a man hides inside, and this unbroken silence due to family
    contempt against this one lonely man becomes a place of unbroken
    isolation … all from one fateful decision. More than frustration, it
    points to a man who lived in the shaddows of his once place of openness.
    Nothing could have prepared him beforehand to engage in another
    conversation as he left his home, his family and his potential behind.

  • Heidi Miller

    Andrew – My husband and I are currently in a very tight financial situation or we would give like crazy! I do want to know though, is there an event or something I could organize for my friends who would be interested in giving? Have you done anything like this in the past or do you have any promotional materials I could show/display to do something like this? I want to help however we can!!!