This Says It All

This is literally what Christian Outreach to the LGBT Community looks like:

Much love.

www.themarinfoundation.org  (Picture Credit goes to Michelle from Maladjusted Media)

About Andrew Marin

Andrew Marin is President and Founder of The Marin Foundation (www.themarinfoundation.org). He is author of the award winning book Love Is an Orientation (2009), its interactive DVD curriculum (2011), and recently an academic ebook titled Our Last Option: How a New Approach to Civility can Save the Public Square (2013). Andrew is a regular contributor to a variety of media outlets and frequently lectures at universities around the world. Since 2010 Andrew has been asked by the United Nations to advise their various agencies on issues of bridging opposing worldviews, civic engagement, and theological aspects of reconciliation. For twelve years he lived in the LGBT Boystown neighborhood of Chicago, and is currently based St. Andrews, Scotland, where he is teaching and researching at the University of St. Andrews earning his PhD in Constructive Theology with a focus on the Theology of Culture. Andrew's research centers on the cultural, political, and religious dynamics of reconciliation. Andrew is married to Brenda, and you can find him elsewhere on Twitter (@Andrew_Marin), Facebook (AndrewMarin01), and Instagram (@andrewmarin1).

  • Nathalie Ais

    you sure know how to pull on the heart. lol. :)

    i too share your desire,
    where does the confidence come from? God? faith? Jesus?

  • Nathalie Ais

    to know what you are doing, this desire is Christ/God centered and not just our own desire. that it is truly the will of the FNather and not a ploy of Satan. i’m thinking you may have thought this over before. what a journey to serve God.

    i ask it out of love and a desire to build up with love and truth. having both is the difficult part.

  • blake

    Natalie, what Andrew does is what Jesus did in scripture. NEVER did He belittle, shun or ostracise those considered “sinners” by the religious leaders.

    If He did that, then I think its a safe bet we must too. Read matthew 23- this is how most religious leaders behave today and those attitudes are not seen in what The Marin Foundation does.

  • Angela

    Thank you for this website. It is an interesting aspect of discussion that often one can see another’s viewpoint and this helps clarify your own, if you are really looking for truth…..
    what people are saying reflects the spirit of the age. ……..we’ve has new age etc movements ……….now we’ve got the gay rights movement.It’s a very important issue because it touches on so many other issues. Sacrifice, sexuality, human relationships, belief systems vs faith…….To declare yourself attracted to people because of their gender is not the scriptural concept of marriage. We all are born and live in a fallen state and it is the grace of God that saves us. The bible and indeed God himself commands us to be uncompromisingly righteous. It tells the story of righteous Lot. It is not impossible to be righteous. It does take willingness rather than acceptance of ‘feelings’. God provides the strength. It is true our communities may be disfunctional and this may be politically motivated.You declare yourself an ‘alpha male’ this itself is a sexist notion. I think in many people it is only the fear of reprisals that stop them doing evil, not because they have God given love, otherwise we would not need laws to govern us. Even Christians are taught to fear God and can act out of respectful fear to which God is due.Gays are only bothered about being accepted by the church and therefore the wider community because they think they should be able to express their sexuality freely not because they seriously care about what God thinks.But at what cost? If they can find love and acceptance within the church and freely carry out their sexuality they may feel comfortable there given the human need to belong to a community, however this may not save their souls. (Any sex outside marriage is not acceptable to the perfect will of Jesus.) I dont believe in casting people out of our affections or churches, but there is a difference between trying not to sin but stumbling and accepting sin as a way of life.People in churches who believe being gay is ungodly have feelings and passions too.We shouldn’t tolerate wrong in our own lives.I am aware of my evil nature. The bible teaches us the truth that there is no good thing in myself. This doesn’t mean I hate myself…..I know within my own limited understanding and experience how much Jesus loves me .To love and serve God, I need help to stop from doing wrong, I need support from the community. I do not need acceptance of wrong doing. That does not help me.None of us are worthy but if we don’t love God with all our hearts we will not see the Kingdom. That is the message we should preach each other inside and outside the church.

    • http://www.livingitout.com Rachel

      But what is wonderful Angela is that despite us having such different views, we’re still friends (in real life). Your lived practice is just the same as Andrew’s – you hold your views about same-sex relationships and alongside that have genuine relationships with people in same-sex relationships. Which I think is great because I really value our friendship!

      • Angela

        Hi Rachel……….lol…….you were very much on my mind when I was writing this which is excellent because I remembered not to offend you as I respect you as a person despite our many differences :) (You know how I can be sooooo rude sometimes.) The bible enlightens us to our fallen state and says if God does not really exist then Christians are the most pitiful group on the earth………..honestly, HIs word is so amazing and I enjoy the opportunity to share my faith despite it being contrary to others beliefs because it strengthens me. This does not depend on personality, it’s a promise of God.

        • Angela

          ps. do you think Andrew is secretly gay?

          • Angela

            oops! apologies to those who dont know me……..that was an ‘in’ joke :)

  • Jack Harris

    Thoughts on Gay Pride San Francisco 2010

    Tim and I arrived, very excited but were pretty tired so we really didn’t get out until later the first evening on Friday. We attended a couple of parties in the South of Market Area. Lots of good music, food, dancing and socializing. My jet lag was pretty severe so I was not able to talk with folks as I would like but what I walked away from the first night was that the diversity of the gay community seems to manifest itself in very unique ways. The dance party we went to was mainly masculine, muscular guys who many didn’t feel as if they suffered much discrimination while in high school. A lof of these guys were very closeted during those years and were often jocks or popular guys that didn’t come out until later in life.

    It seemed to me that a few guys I chatted with about faith said that they didn’t necessarily have the emotional/religious scarring that other who were more more feminine did. A lot of these guys were in committed relationships like Tim and I. Not only were they your average joe kinda gay guy they, a few of shared that they had a church family in Bay Area. Not surprisingly, most were MCC, UCC, Episcopal and Lutheran. I DID wonder, about all the guys I DIDNT talk to. How many of them were out? How many of them knew Jesus? Heck, how many even had contact with their family? I would make a strong guess and say that were married men in the crowd–who mainly would come to an event like this as an escape from their “other life”. I went to bed thinking the gay community here is pretty diverse..and extremely large!

    Saturday : We went to the Castro District which really can only be described a Gay Disneyland! An amazing collection of GLBT folks, shops and restaurants. This is clearly the epicenter of the GLBT community in SF. A walk down the street was also like visiting the United Nations. People from all walks of life, countries, races and nationalities. The whole range of humanity was/is present here. In general my interactions seemed to point out that most “locals” are very friendly and very willing to talk about almost anything! There doesn’t seem to be the unwillingness to talk about faith like you see in other places. In Atlanta for example, GLBT folks are pretty defensive when discussing Christianity: I guess because it’s the bible belt. Back to SF though, many had shared with me, that what irritated them most is the very intentional desire upon some Christian groups to demonize gay folks and treat us as issues rather than people. In general, I got the impression many had a spiritual foundation, but not necessarily a religious one.

    After a wonderful morning of shopping we had lunch then went over to the festival at the civic center. I wonderful setting! Very spacious and had several performers..including the Back Street Boys which was unfortunate but oh well. lol. Every organization you can think of that would be GLBT or GLBT friendly was there. Several churches had tents but noticeable missing were the Evangelical Churches. In fact I didn’t even see any protesters there or the PRIDE Parade the next day.

    After a disco nap we headed out on the town again and went to a few bars in the area south of market and chatted with several guys. I had asked a few if they had much experience with religious groups in the area and most say that had rarely if ever met any overtly negative Christian groups. What was even more interesting was that while many did not seem to have a Christian background, they didn’t seem to have a negative immpression of Christianity. It seemed to be a live and let live kinda attitude. There didn’t seem to be the wounds inflicted that maybe other GLBT folks have.

    Later in the Castro there was a shooting, one person was killed. This truly devastated the local folks because rarely is there violence in the area. Thankfully Tim and I were not close to the shooting and I went to bed thanking God for the protection he offered us–because it could have very easily been us.

    Sunday, we slept until like noon since we had been up so late the night before. Sunday was the parade on market street and several GLBT Affirming Churches marched in the parade including Bp. Bruno of the Episcopal Diocese of Northern California, a spiritual leader in the inclusion of GLBT folks in the Episcopal Church.

    Monday was a day of touring the Mission, Golden Gate, Grace Episcopal Cathedral then to bed early for our flight.

    Soo..here I sit typing this at 35000 feet to keep awake! What I walked away from this experience, was that SF Pride brings together God’s people, Gay and Straight and from all walks of life and belief systems. I felt that if God would be present anywhere it would certainly be here. Tim and I had a great time. I wish I could take a group of group of less gay friendly Christians to Gay Pride SF, so that they could see for themselves, that GLBT people are people just like everyone else–who live and love, cry and celebrate, mourn, laugh, worry, stress, marry, work and sleep just like everyone else. Our differences are man made.

    Grace Cathedral has an amazing labyrinth on the nave floor that you can walk and refelct on your spiritual life. I decided to do this while visiting and as I was thinking about our closing hours in SF…and what it all meant..an anglican hymn …”of the father’s love begotten..came to my mind for some reason…i will close with a few versus…

    Of the Father’s love begotten
    Ere the worlds began to be,
    He is Alpha and Omega,
    He the Source, the Ending He,
    Of the things that are, that have been,
    And that future years shall see
    Evermore and evermore.
    Jack

    • http://www.loveisanorientation.com Andrew Marin

      Wow. Thank you so much. I am going to post what you wrote as an actual post for everyone to see. I REALLY appriciate you, and your thoughts! :) Much love Jack!

  • Jack

    Andrew,

    I was pretty exhausted when I wrote this so I hope it made sense. Lol!

    • http://www.loveisanorientation.com Andrew Marin

      It totally makes sense! It was great.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X