Part 2: Life in Boystown

Recently I started an on-going series called Life in Boystown, which will chronicle some of the unique moments of what it means for me to live where I do. Here is the second installment:

The other day I was riding on the bus down the main strip of Boystown and was reading Mother Teresa’s book Come Be My Light (which seems to be 60% off right now on Amazon!). Anyway, the guy sitting next to me kept leaning over, obviously shifting his head between the book’s cover and myself. Back and forth – the book’s cover and myself; the book’s cover and myself.

So I stopped reading, put the book down, looked at him, smiled and said hi. He immediately lit up with a huge grin and pointed at the book. The conversation went as followed:

Me: Hey! How are you?

Man: Great! I see you’re reading that book by Mother Teresa. Do you like it?

[At this point I’m thinking he’s a Christian, big church going guy, because on the public transportation system in Chicago there seems to be some strange sense of duty when Christians see other Christians reading the Bible or Christian books while riding, to say hi and start a conversation. There always seems to be some sort of unspoken rule where one of the people have to make eye contact and then say hi and talk about the Christian literature that is being read—like we’re a secret society or something. I try to avoid these situations as much as I can. I just want to read, not talk.]

Me: Yeah, it’s pretty intense. I never knew she felt so alone and far from God.

[The man starts to cry out of nowhere. This was my give-away that he was not one of those Christian-obligation-to-talk-type-people.]

Man: Yes. Yes. You see, I’m gay. And ever since I came out about 15 years ago (he seemed to be around my age) I was told by my family that I was far from God. That God wouldn’t ever listen to me. That I was destined to be alone, without God by my side, my whole life. So I left God far, far behind.

[At this point I put my arm around him and just sat there. My stop came and went and I just kept sitting there with him because something told me words wouldn’t do too much justice at this point.]

Man: But then you know what?

Me: What?

Man: A friend of mine, who is also gay, gave me that book and said I should read it because it gave him a whole new perspective that someone who was so close to God still felt so far from God. I read it and it changed my life because for the first time in 15 years I now know that even the best Christians can feel far from God. Reading that book was the most authentic thing I’ve ever heard from a person who believes in God. And to imagine Mother Teresa felt her dark night of the soul for 50 years and still kept doing what she did!? Sure made me examine my life and bitterness too. For the very first time in my life I feel like I have any hope that God loves me.

Me: God does love you. I believe that. And I believe that God listens to you when you talk to God; even though we might not feel like it. I know that to be true, because there are certain times when I feel like I pray and it just goes into thin air. But I guess I’m learning that that’s the point of faith and faithfulness. Anyone can be faithful when they feel God hears every word they pray.

[The man smiled at this point, and chuckled a little bit.]

Man: You know the funny thing is that I would have never believed you in what you just said until I read that book. I would have thought you were crazy, but now I feel like I’m part of that craziness too.

[The man pulled the string on the bus to let the driver know he was getting off at the next stop. He gave me a big hug…]

Man: Thanks for listening and letting me cry some. I’m super embarrassed. But the good thing is, you don’t know me and I’ll probably never see you again, so that makes me feel better.

Me: Well, [as I break out in a big smile because I thought what he just said was pretty funny] my name is Andrew. Great to meet you. I’ll also pray that you believe God hears you. And thanks for sharing. It meant a lot to me. Love you brother.

[With his lip quivering a little…]

Man: Brother? Thank you. Love you too brother.

[And with that he got off the bus, turned a little and waved to me as the bus pulled away.]

Life in Boystown.

Much love.

www.themarinfoundation.org

Print Friendly

About Andrew Marin

Andrew Marin is President and Founder of The Marin Foundation (www.themarinfoundation.org). He is author of the award winning book Love Is an Orientation (2009), its interactive DVD curriculum (2011), and recently an academic ebook titled Our Last Option: How a New Approach to Civility can Save the Public Square (2013). Andrew is a regular contributor to a variety of media outlets and frequently lectures at universities around the world. Since 2010 Andrew has been asked by the United Nations to advise their various agencies on issues of bridging opposing worldviews, civic engagement, and theological aspects of reconciliation. For twelve years he lived in the LGBT Boystown neighborhood of Chicago, and is currently based St. Andrews, Scotland, where he is teaching and researching at the University of St. Andrews earning his PhD in Constructive Theology with a focus on the Theology of Culture. Andrew's research centers on the cultural, political, and religious dynamics of reconciliation. Andrew is married to Brenda, and you can find him elsewhere on Twitter (@Andrew_Marin), Facebook (AndrewMarin01), and Instagram (@andrewmarin1).

  • http://Facebook.com/davemantel Dave Mantel

    Andrew. Thanks for that. God’s turning a new chapter in my life and reading your posts helps a lot.

    Grace and peace,
    -Dave

    • http://www.loveisanorientation.com Andrew Marin

      Much love Dave!

  • http://www.twitter.com/chrishyde Chris Hyde

    Wow…I LOVE this post. Thank you. You are such a blessing to so many people!!!

    • http://www.loveisanorientation.com Andrew Marin

      Thanks Chris! I think a lot of these types of situations have so much to do with proximity. If I didn’t live here I wouldn’t have these unique interactions. I’m blessed to be able to be here.

  • Mrs T

    What a wonderful story! I wish you could have given him your business card. Well, maybe we can pray you can meet him again!

    • http://www.loveisanorientation.com Andrew Marin

      That will teach me not to carry business cards around! I’ve been praying for him since we met.

      • Bruce

        Yes and amen Andrew…. that must teach you to not carry bussiness cards around….
        I know you didn’t mean it that way…. but to give him a ministry card might have seemed a plastic adendum to what had just happened.
        Your prayers will work wonders!!!

        Great story/testimony.

        • http://www.loveisanorientation.com Andrew Marin

          True. True. I didn’t think about it that way. Well, maybe I still won’t carry them around :) The last thing I ever want to do is cheapen the moment.

          • Bruce

            Well, you know I would never encourage that either… just to be sensetive to when it is appropriate…. they can be great tools and connectors too!
            That guy will never be the same.

            • http://www.loveisanorientation.com Andrew Marin

              I’m not hating brother! I hear you.

  • Marti

    Awesome….thanks for sharing this story…Thank you for listening and letting him share

  • http://www.christaallan.com Christa Allan

    Books can be such amazing tools in God’s hands. This story is a beautiful testimony to how a simple “hi” can change lives.

  • http://carleton1958.xanga.com/ Xanga Jeff

    Andrew, thanks for posting thi.s What a beautiful story. I just added this book to my Amazon wish list to read sometime soon (maybe on my son’s new Kindle). This encounter you had brought tears to my eyes.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X