Chick-fil-A Biblical Family of the Day

Chick-fil-A president Dan Cathy: “We support biblical families.”

Today’s Chick-fil-A Biblical Family of the Day: “She has hidden her son” (2 Kings 6:24-29).

Some time later King Ben-hadad of Aram mustered his entire army; he marched against Samaria and laid siege to it.

As the siege continued, famine in Samaria became so great that a donkey’s head was sold for eighty shekels of silver, and one-fourth of a kab of dove’s dung for five shekels of silver.

Now as the king of Israel was walking on the city wall, a woman cried out to him, “Help, my lord king!”

He said, “No! Let the Lord help you. How can I help you? From the threshing-floor or from the wine press?” But then the king asked her, “What is your complaint?”

She answered, “This woman said to me, ‘Give up your son; we will eat him today, and we will eat my son tomorrow.’ So we cooked my son and ate him. The next day I said to her, ‘Give up your son and we will eat him.’ But she has hidden her son.”

  • ohiolibrarian

    Cannibalism? Really?

  • Ross Thompson

    Wait, what?

    I guess that King Soloman story makes more sense now.

  • Ross Thompson

    Wait, what?

    I guess that King Soloman story makes more sense now.

  • StillCraig

    In contxt, this story illustrates how brutal siege warfare was in the ancient world.  It’s hardly an endorsement of cannibalism.

  • Julian Elson

    I bet some Samarians threw some rocks at the Aramites, or some Samarians walked into the security buffer zone, though. I’d say it’s justified. Aram has a right to defend itself.

  • rm

    I will repeat myself: reading this makes me feel a bit better about enjoying A Song of Ice and Fire. It doesn’t celebrate evil, just shows what us human bastards are really like in the same way as these Biblical Family stories do. 

  • Parisienne

    Every time Fred puts one of these up I have a “ugh I am NEVER going to eat Chick fil-A” reaction (even if I was on a continent where it existed) and it’s nothing to do with their ethical or theological positions.

    The pictures of the food turn my stomach.

    Like seriously, that bread roll? Bread is never meant to be that homogenous and uniform. What they hell is in it and what does it do to your insides?

  • rm

    Parisienne, the sandwiches are delicious. It’s the side dish of puritanical political hypocrisy that keeps me away.

  • http://www.blogger.com/home?pli=1 Coleslaw

    I know most people think the sandwiches are delicious, but to me they are just okay. If I had to stop for a meal on the road and the only choice was Chik-Fil-A, I could eat it, but it’s not something I’d go out of my way to buy, irrespective of the politics. Seriously, we have one a short drive from my house near a store I shop at all the time, and the only time we ate there was when we got a two for one meal coupon about a year ago. Even before the boycott started, we haven’t felt inclined to go there.

  • OriginalExtraCrispy

    I ate there a couple of times in high school and have never felt inclined to eat there again. There’s one next door to a place I visit several days a week, but even without their bigotry, I’ve never had any interest in eating there.

  • aunursa

    How do Christians have a revulsion to cannibalism but not to the Eucharist?  (Especially Catholics, who I am told, believe that the bread and wine actually become the body and blood of their savior.)

  • flat

    Well Dr Lecter has an refined taste in serving men, so we can ask him for advice for diner.

    Then again he is an atheist and mostly eats adults so it’s gonna be difficult to ask him to help us for our christian cannibalistic dinner .

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Ann-Unemori/100001112760232 Ann Unemori

    “Christian Cannibalistic Dinner”, now there’s a name for a band!

  • http://redwoodr.tumblr.com Redwood Rhiadra

     While I’ve never been to a Chick-Fil-A, I can tell you that the real bread roll is *not* going to be homogenous and uniform as shown in the picture. The sandwich in the picture was specially prepared for photography and is probably not edible.  This is standard practice for pictures of food.

  • Ian needs a nickname

    Christians are revolted by cannibalism for the same reasons most people are revolted by cannibalism.*  Christians are  not revolted by the Eucharist partly because Jesus got better and partly because they deliberately don’t think about it very hard.

    (* – exception:  in some cultures, funerary cannibalism.  I could imagine myself playing along with that)

  • GDwarf

     

    Like seriously, that bread roll? Bread is never meant to be that
    homogenous and uniform. What they hell is in it

    Photoshop, mostly. :P

    and what does it do to
    your insides?

    If http://www.psdisasters.com is to be trusted, horrible, horrible, things. :P

    More seriously, the vast majority of bread products sold are mostly sawdust. The good news is that it makes the bread look fluffier and makes it more filling while adding zero calories. On the other hand, you’re eating sawdust.

  • aunursa

    Christians are not revolted by the Eucharist partly because Jesus got better

    I don’t understand that.  “Jesus got better” … what does that mean?

  • Seraph4377

     And also because, even for Catholics who profess firm belief in The Miracle of Transubstantiation, the bread and wine remains bread and wine as far as all senses can perceive.  If the consecration of the Eucharist actually transformed bread and wine into meat and blood, that would probably change a few taboos.

    But even then, that would be magic creating meat and blood that didn’t come from a visible human source.  Probably still wouldn’t feel like cannibalism.

    You bring up funerary cannibalism.  How do societies who practice that respond to plain old “murder them and eat body parts” cannibalism?

  • Ross Thompson

     

    I don’t understand that.  “Jesus got better” … what does that mean?

    That, according to Christian tradition, he stopped being dead.

  • EllieMurasaki

    Watch Monty Python and the Holy Grail sometime.

  • Ben English

    Because most of us can tell the difference between a symbolic ritual and literally eating human flesh?

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    I was under the distinct impression that cellulose wasn’t permitted to be added to bread, unlike in world war 2.

  • Amaryllis

     Among the anthropophagi,
    People’s friends are people’s sarcophagi.

    - Ogden Nash

  • Carstonio

    My family had a Good Friday tradition of abstaining from land meat, with fish being acceptable for some reason. (Don’t know if this was a Lutheran or Presbyterian or Baptist tradition.) As a teenager, I wondered if the apostles believed the Romans to be cannibals, and chose to stay away from red meat on the weekend of the Crucifixion to avoid eating their savior by mistake.

  • EllieMurasaki

    Just Good Friday? Because Catholics stay clear of meat every Friday in Lent. No, I don’t know why fish isn’t meat.

  • aunursa

    I don’t know why fish isn’t meat.

    For purposes of kashrut (kosher laws), fish isn’t considered meat in Judaism.  Observant Jews will not combine meat and dairy, not even as separate foods in the same meal.  Fish is considered pareve, which means it can be served with either meat dishes or dairy dishes.

  • P J Evans

    the vast majority of bread products sold are mostly sawdust.

    They’d have to list it in in the ingredients. (I don’t think it’s really been used since the labeling requirements were tightened up. Very few people want to eat sawdust.)

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Ann-Unemori/100001112760232 Ann Unemori

    Never forget your basic grammar:

    You have your friends TO dinner. You have your friends FOR dinner if you are Jeffrey Dahmer.

  • http://blog.trenchcoatsoft.com Ross

    I would totally eat bread with a measurable sawdust content. Sawdust is basically pure insoluble fiber. Your average slice of bread is an entire meal’s worth of carbohydrates while you’re still only halfway to being a sandwich.

  • ohiolibrarian

    I’ve heard that at some point the medieval Church was encouraging people to ‘Eat mor Fish’ more or less as a practical matter. My mother ate fish on Fridays though and she is Ukrainian Orthodox.

  • ohiolibrarian

     What is odd is the sort of offhand way it took place. There is no tone of horror there. These are supposed to be their CHILDREN and even more oddly, the King’s child. Compare with Theseus going off with the other sacrifices to the Minotaur.

    Actually it reminds me of your basic fairy tale. Baba Yaga or the witch in Hansel and Gretel.

  • MaryKaye

    I actually find the story (in this translation at least) pretty effective as horror, precisely for that offhandedness.  I hear the woman speaking as someone who has been completely destroyed by what she has seen and done, and that’s why she speaks of it so flatly.  (I don’t see where you’re getting it being the King’s child, though.  Am I missing a detail?)
     

  • MaryKaye

    I actually find the story (in this translation at least) pretty effective as horror, precisely for that offhandedness.  I hear the woman speaking as someone who has been completely destroyed by what she has seen and done, and that’s why she speaks of it so flatly.  (I don’t see where you’re getting it being the King’s child, though.  Am I missing a detail?)
     

  • Lori

    Neither child was the King’s. The mother who was “cheated” went to the King to get him to make the other mother live up to her end of the deal.

  • rm

    Yes, the two women had a deal, and the second woman isn’t sticking to her side. I think what this story is missing is the Law & Order theme music — the music that tells you the big confession is about to take place, followed by the killer’s deadpan reveal of the horrible truth, followed by the credits. 

  • AnonaMiss

    According to one of my high school history teachers (who had a doctorate and specialized in the Canadian colonial period, so I suspect he knew what he was talking about), when the French began having success converting Native Americans in Canada to Catholicism, they observed a drop in the quantity of beaver pelts their American trading partners had to offer. It turned out that the American tribes were killing fewer beavers because they were observing the rule that one was not to eat meat on Fridays. Since this was effectively reducing the furs they could send back to Europe by 1/7th, the Vatican officially classified the beaver as a fish.

    No point, just the discussion of fish and dietary laws reminded me of it!

  • http://blog.trenchcoatsoft.com Ross

     And yet the poor Barnacle Goose still counts as a bird.


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