Garlic? Honey, I’m like buttah. Like BUTTAH!

You know…all fat and salty!

Anyhow, back in September I did an interview with Jonathan Merritt at the Religion News Service, talking about idols and the pope and whatnot, and today the piece has dropped:

Pope Francis craze may be idolatry, says Catholic writer Elizabeth Scalia

Elizabeth Scalia claims to be a shy person, happy to hang in the background. But the popular Catholic Portal editor at Patheos, writing as “The Anchoress”, doesn’t shy away from offering opinions as strong as garlic. In her recent book, Strange Gods: Unmasking the Idols of Everyday Life, she has plenty to say about the dangers of modern day idolatry. But perhaps most controversial is Scalia’s recent assertion that the world may be making an idol out of Pope Francis, who recently received an 88% approval rating from American Catholics. Here, we discuss how she understands idolatry and the reasoning behind her questioning of American’s love for the popular Pope.

RNS: It’s so much easier to spot other people’s idols—in other centuries or on other continents in other religions—than to spot our own. What’s at the root of this blindness?

ES: It’s always easier to spot deficiency in others, right? Someone else’s hypocrisy or mean-spiritedness is always obvious to us, another century’s shortfalls are easy to see in hindsight, another nation’s aggressions more obvious than our own. We all want to believe we’re the good guys.

The truth is, we are all good guys, and sometimes we are all bad guys, too. In terms of idolatry, we all seek to find ourselves reflected in that thing or person that has characteristics we imagine we possess, too. Why did the ancient Israelites form a golden idol–and why a calf, especially? They’d been wandering a desert; they were feeling lost, uncertain of what they were becoming, and hungry for what was familiar. A calf was well-defined, strong, life-sustaining; its purpose was known. Hew it out of gold, polish it up and voila! In the glistening surface of the calf they literally saw themselves, projected onto this vital image. Our idols are always about ourselves.

You can read the rest, here; eventually you’ll get to what a priest friend called my “controversial” thoughts on idolatry and Francis.

And in case you missed it, you can go here to read Part II of my interview Kathryn Lopez, who started Part I at NRO.

Speaking of NRO, you can read my contribution to their little Christmas symposium, in which I pondered Duke Ellington and the process of Incarnation

Speaking of Process, if you can stand the horrid pic of me, here is my piece at OSV on giving chase to the Holy Spirit.

Speaking of the Holy Spirit, and the way it moves through the threading of our lives, I write about that in this look at a few paragraphs of Evangelii Gaudium.

Considering all that shameless self-promotion, I guess I am like garlic; I let you know I’m around. Ain’t I a stinker? Talk amongst yourselves.

About Elizabeth Scalia
  • Maggie Goff

    You’re making me giggle. I have to go read everything now. You weren’t kidding when you said you are all over the internet! ;)

  • George.a.da.Jungle

    Garlic is mahvelous, dahling, love it!

  • http://ashesfromburntroses.blogspot.com/ Manny

    I’ll go check out the interview, but before that I wanted to say you don’t come across as shy in your blog. Of course that doesn’t mean you aren’t. I have no idea, but I found it hard to think of you as shy from your writing. But a writer’s persona is not necessarily the actual persona. I’m pretty sure there’s a distinction in my writing and in the flesh personas. And it’s not a conscious effort on the writer’s part; it just happens that one writes with a different voice (and subtley personality) than one speaks. Does that make sense?


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