Scientifically Examining the Turin Shroud: Resurrection Sunday Deux

Scientifically Examining the Turin Shroud: Resurrection Sunday Deux April 12, 2015
This is only half of it. The other part of the shroud has Christ's back.
This is only half of it. The other part of the shroud has Christ’s back (Anonymous, Shroud of Turin, 1st-14th century; Source: Wikimedia Commons; PD-Old-100).

There are those who automatically shrilly say their faith doesn’t hang upon The Shroud of Turin whenever the object is mentioned.

My faith doesn’t hang upon it either, but that’s beside the point. The scientific wars surrounding this potential relic are really, really fun to follow.

However, Larry Chapp says that Catholicism is the most worldly of all religions and so this artefact has a bearing on that.

In connection with today being Resurrection Sunday in Orthodox Christendom, I’d like you to take a look at the following video of a Roman Catholic layman speaking about the shroud.

Incidentally, I saw the video first published by Orthodox pop-writer Frederica Matthews-Green, author of The Jesus Prayer: The Ancient Desert Prayer that Tunes the Heart to God.

Her comments on the video were:

Today I watched this 2014 presentation on the Shroud of Turin, and learned a lot. Did you know that, when carbon dating in 1988 said it was a medieval forgery, that the sample was contaminated? The scientists had recommended that the Vatican give them 6 samples from different places on the cloth, and the Vatican at the last minute said they would only give one, and they took it from a far corner where, it turned out, the cloth had been rewoven in the medieval era. So the carbon dating was accurate, it was just not an original part of the Shroud that they tested.

Everything else about the Shroud is amazing, and convincing. But here, in this photo, is something I never knew. The moment that the image was imprinted on the cloth (by some kind of light or energy radiation; no one knows how to duplicate it) the cloth must have separated from the body and lain flat, like photographic plates, above and below. The body floated between the two levels of the cloth (the image of the back of the body is not resting on the cloth, but like a photo on the cloth). Energy radiated out in all directions, like an atomic bomb, the presenter says–matter turned into energy. It went in all directions of course, but imprinted above and below the body onto the cloth as a flat surface.

For more on the Shroud see The Newest News on the Authenticity of the Shroud of Turin!

UPDATE: My friends tell me Ian Wilson’s The Shroud: The 2000-Year Mystery Solved is the most definitive account of the Shroud of Turin out there.


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