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September 18, 2016

If the Prodigal Son had been able to work through the smothering lies that come with shame, would he have come home sooner? I’ve heard others ask it this way: “If the Prodigal Son had Xanax, would he have ever come home?” Early in recovery, my biggest struggle with returning to the Church was getting past that sense of not being good enough. My fear of being compared to all the other “normal” Christians made it very hard to believe in a Father who was inherently good, patient, and kind. The Church had been my home for nearly three decades, but after such a massive personal failure, I wasn’t sure how I fit into it anymore. From my own experience, the Church knows how to deal with addiction, adultery, and anger. But mental illness dumbfounds them. Read more

September 16, 2016

Suicide Prevention Month lasts another two weeks and I’m pumped to tell you that I’ve partnered with Amazon to give away 10 copies of my books over the next 14 days. The giveaway is live right now. Read more

September 15, 2016

How can you apologize for the wrong you’re about to commit? How can you possibly make right what will never be right? Five years earlier, I stood at an altar before God and promised to cherish and respect her until death. This was not what either of us had in mind. Read more

September 15, 2016

I blog often about how the power of vulnerability and transparency has changed my life. But it’s only because a lack of those things created an environment of toxicity and shame that nearly killed me. I was recently interviewed by Jon Fuller for the R U Real Podcast and in our talk, we cover the power of vulnerability for the Christian and anyone recovering from abuse, addiction, or a suicide attempt. Read more

September 14, 2016

It took me three days to realize I’m building toward a panic attack. I think of it like a simmering pot that begs for days to boil. Eventually it may. Or it may finally run out of steam, still piping hot, producing nothing but exhaustion, confusion, frustration, and sticky sweat. It reminds me of dingy socks. Read more

September 12, 2016

Mental illness is no respecter of persons. Anxiety and depression are equal opportunity employers and they do not care what kind of day or week or year you’re having. And along with mental illness comes shame. Shame whispers things like “You can’t get your own shit together, so stop writing.” It tells lies like, “You are crazy and this will never get better.” Read more

September 11, 2016

I am no longer the boy who intentionally memorizes Scripture, and I haven’t been the President of anything in more than a decade. I work a part-time job, live paycheck-to-paycheck, and being hired by a new church was one of the scariest experiences in the past four years. Read more

September 10, 2016

Contrary to popular belief, not everyone who attempts suicide has lived the life of a tortured soul. In my situation, I had suffered with anxiety and depression, but I was also outwardly successful. When I lost my job, it seemed that my world was crumbling, and all of my years of secretly struggling caught up with me. I believed the lie that the only way out was to die. I think it’s probably true for a vast majority of the people who attempt suicide every single year. For most people, there is a crisis moment in which suicide happens, but getting someone with suicidal ideations to see past that is vital. If you can help a desperate person see beyond the immediacy of a very difficult time, you could save their life. Here’s a few of my favorites… Read more

September 9, 2016

Today’s post includes 7 awesome reviews of my brand-new book, plus 3 super easy ways for you to win a personalized, autographed copy! Read more

September 8, 2016

Recovery is a long road. There’s counseling, intense therapy, new meds, and lots and lots of embarrassing honesty. But I made it. Thanks to good doctors, lots of prayer, and a kick-ass support system, I was able to find a strength I didn’t know I had: the strength to admit I was weak. And that made me a brand new man. Read more




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