what are biblical genealogies and what do they do? (guest series by Denis Lamoureux)

Today we begin a 6-part audio-slide series by Denis Lamoureux on the always gripping, never boring, live-changing topic of all those “begats” in the Bible, a.k.a., biblical genealogies.

Stop rolling your eyes.

Actually, in my experience, genealogies–what they are and how they function in the Bible–is about as commonly misunderstood as any biblical genre.

As Lamoureux puts it, “Most Christians assume that genealogies in the Bible are merely lists of related family members quite similar to genealogies today. However, in the ancient world the primary purpose of a genealogy was to offer an important message about the community or nation. In this series of episodes we will look at various genealogies in Scripture, and then come to a conclusion regarding why Adam appears in the biblical genealogies found in Genesis 5, 1 Chronicles, and Luke 3.”

The series is as follows. To view part 1, Introduction, click here. Subsequent segments will appear each Tuesday.

  1. Introduction (9 mins)
  2. Genealogies of Jesus in Matthew 1 & Luke 3 (10 mins)
  3. Sumerian Kings List (9 mins)
  4. Hebrew Patriarchs in Genesis 5 & 11  (11 mins)
  5. Adam & Biblical Genealogies (22 mins)
  6. Conclusion (9 mins)

Lamoureux holds three earned doctoral degrees (dentistry, theology, and biology) and is associate professor of science and religion at St. Joseph’s College in the University of Alberta (full bio here). He is the author of I Love Jesus & I Accept Evolution (see first of the audio slide series on this book here) which is a great introduction to his view of origins called “evolutionary creation.”

 

who were Jesus' ancestors? (Lamoureux on genealogies, part 2)
are the Genesis flood genealogies literal? (Lamoureux on genealogies part 3)
genealogies of the Hebrew Patriarchs (Canadian Lamoureux on genealogies part 4)
Denis Lamoureux's conclusion to his series on biblical genealogies
  • Brian P.

    As a contemporary genealogist who has put much effort into finding ancestry across continents and centuries, I don’t necessarily find it helpful for you to dismiss my efforts as mere or my work as but a list. I have put hundreds of hours into citing every source, properly documenting conflicting evidence, justifying conclusions, etc. Yes, both my purposes and techniques may be different from the Evangelists, but you needn’t use pejorative language.

    • peteenns

      I don’t think Denis or I are dismissing the work of contemporary genealogists. Personally, I have benefitted from such work in helping me contact long lost relatives. The aim is actually at those who take the biblical genealogies as essentially an objective list of descendants, and in so doing–ironically–don’t take them seriously enough. Anyway, I don’t want you to feel offended by this, Brian. I’m certain neither does Denis.

      • Brian P.

        Thank you for the kind words and recognition of our hard work. I connected and help connect many of my family members. For right or for wrong, my project hasn’t been theological or hagiographic. I’ve come across things that over the years have been ashamed of, avoided, and recast. A few months ago with the skills I’ve developed, I helped my wife’s father know for the first time with fairly high confidence who his mother’s father is. Don’t assume there’s homogeneity in understanding what modern family genealogies are and what they do. In fact, contemporary genealogists have different goals and different levels of skills. As a final note, it’s nearly impossible to discuss modern genealogical work without the contributions, influence, and possibly even theology of Latter Day Saints. (Btw, my understandings of genealogy and of evolution are quite interrelated. Shouldn’t they be?)

  • http://restoringpangea.com/ Nathan Smith

    perfect timing, I can use this to help with our discussion on this in my O.T./N.T. Lit classes

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Censorship Censored

    P e d i g r e e. Only the properly bred are the chosen ones.

  • mark

    Lamoureux holds three earned doctoral degrees (dentistry, theology, and biology) and is associate professor of science and religion at St. Joseph’s College in the University of Alberta (full bio here).

    This audio-slide series isn’t gonna be like pulling teeth, is it?

  • mark

    The aim is actually at those who take the biblical genealogies as essentially an objective list of descendants

    I have some bad news for you–I have relatives of Persian Jewish origin who can trace their genealogy directly back to Esther. So there!

  • mark

    How’s this?

    Pete: The aim is actually at those who take the biblical genealogies as essentially an objective list of descendants

    I have some bad news for you–I have relatives of Persian Jewish origin who can trace their genealogy directly back to Esther. So there!

  • http://jesuswithoutbaggage.wordpress.com/ jesuswithoutbaggage

    Sounds like a great series and I look forward to the forthcoming segments.

    By the way, when I was in my 30s I memorized the entire genealogy of Matthew chapter 1 including the added comments–verbatim of course.

  • Jim

    Great. I loved the last series of his you posted. Are these slide shows from a book of his?

  • Nancy R.

    I watched Ken Ham explain to Bill Nye how to determine the age of the earth by adding up the Biblical genealogies. Even after just the introduction to this series, it’s clear that Ham is misinterpreting the meaning of these genealogies, and misusing them as a result.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X