‘Standing with God and the crushed and bleeding slave’

Today is the 237th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. It’s also the 161st anniversary of an essential speech by an essential American: Frederick Douglass’ 1852 address, “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?

Read the whole thing, but here are some excerpts I find powerful:

Fellow Citizens, I am not wanting in respect for the fathers of this republic. The signers of the Declaration of Independence were brave men. They were great men too-great enough to give fame to a great age. It does not often happen to a nation to raise, at one time, such a number of truly great men. The point from which I am compelled to view them is not, certainly the most favorable; and yet I cannot contemplate their great deeds with less than admiration. They were statesmen, patriots and heroes, and for the good they did, and the principles they contended for, I will unite with you to honor their memory.

… To all inspiring motives, to noble deeds which can be gained from the past, we are welcome. But now is the time, the important time. …

Fellow-citizens, pardon me, allow me to ask, why am I called upon to speak here today? What have I, or those I represent, to do with your national independence? Are the great principles of political freedom and of natural justice, embodied in that Declaration of Independence, extended to us? and am I, therefore, called upon to bring our humble offering to the national altar, and to confess the benefits and express devout gratitude for the blessings resulting from your independence to us?

Would to God, both for your sakes and ours, that an affirmative answer could be truthfully returned to these questions! … But, such is not the state of the case. I say it with a sad sense of the disparity between us. I am not included within the pale of this glorious anniversary! Your high independence only reveals the immeasurable distance between us. The blessings in which you, this day, rejoice, are not enjoyed in common. — The rich inheritance of justice, liberty, prosperity and independence, bequeathed by your fathers, is shared by you, not by me. The sunlight that brought life and healing to you, has brought stripes and death to me. This Fourth July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn. To drag a man in fetters into the grand illuminated temple of liberty, and call upon him to join you in joyous anthems, were inhuman mockery and sacrilegious irony. …

Fellow citizens; above your national, tumultuous joy, I hear the mournful wail of millions! whose chains, heavy and grievous yesterday, are, today, rendered more intolerable by the jubilee shouts that reach them. If I do forget, if I do not faithfully remember those bleeding children of sorrow this day, “may my right hand forget her cunning, and may my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth!” To forget them, to pass lightly over their wrongs, and to chime in with the popular theme, would be treason most scandalous and shocking, and would make me a reproach before God and the world. My subject, then, fellow-citizens, is AMERICAN SLAVERY. I shall see, this day, and its popular characteristics, from the slave’s point of view. Standing, there, identified with the American bondman, making his wrongs mine, I do not hesitate to declare, with all my soul, that the character and conduct of this nation never looked blacker to me than on this 4th of July! Whether we turn to the declarations of the past, or to the profes sions of the present, the conduct of the nation seems equally hideous and revolting. America is false to the past, false to the present, and solemnly binds herself to be false to the future. Standing with God and the crushed and bleeding slave on this occasion, I will, in the name of humanity which is outraged, in the name of liberty which is fettered, in the name of the constitution and the Bible, which are disregarded and trampled upon, dare to call in question and to denounce, with all the emphasis I can command, everything that serves to perpetuate slavery — the great sin and shame of America! “I will not equivocate; I will not excuse;” I will use the severest language I can command; and yet not one word shall escape me that any man, whose judgment is not blinded by prejudice, or who is not at heart a slaveholder, shall not confess to be right and just.

Let me just note here that this is a frequent element in Douglass’ rhetoric. Look again at the claim of that last sentence, that his words will be seen as right and just by “any … whose judgment is not blinded by prejudice” or by economic greed. The contemporary notion of “civility” frets that such harsh assessments of others’ motives are out of bounds. They mistake the presumption of innocence with the notion that innocence must be the only possible outcome of any trial. Douglass will have none of that. He weighs the evidence and announces his verdict.

And he has little patience for those who would appeal to “civility” in order to deny or to delay the only verdict the evidence allows:

But I fancy I hear some one of my audience say, it is just in this circumstance that you and your brother abo litionists fail to make a favorable impression on the public mind. Would you argue more, and denounce less, would you persuade more, and rebuke less, your cause would be much more likely to succeed. But, I submit, where all is plain there is nothing to be argued. What point in the anti-slavery creed would you have me argue? On what branch of the subject do the people of this country need light? …

… There is not a man beneath the canopy of heaven, that does not know that slavery is wrong for him.

What, am I to argue that it is wrong to make men brutes, to rob them of their liberty, to work them without wages, to keep them ignorant of their relations to their fellow men, to beat them with sticks, to flay their flesh with the lash, to load their limbs with irons, to hunt them with dogs, to sell them at auction, to sunder their families, to knock out their teeth, to burn their flesh, to starve them into obedience and submission to their masters? Must I argue that a system thus marked with blood, and stained with pollution, is wrong? No I will not. I have better employment for my time and strength, than such arguments would imply.

What, then, remains to be argued? Is it that slavery is not divine; that God did not establish it; that our doctors of divinity are mistaken? There is blasphemy in the thought. That which is inhuman, cannot be divine! Who can reason on such a proposition? They that can, may; I cannot. The time for such argument is past.

At a time like this, scorching irony, not convincing argument, is needed. O! had I the ability, and could I reach the nation’s ear, I would, today, pour out a fiery stream of biting ridicule, blasting reproach, withering sarcasm, and stern rebuke. For it is not light that is needed, but fire; it is not the gentle shower, but thunder. We need the storm, the whirlwind, and the earthquake. The feeling of the nation must be quickened; the conscience of the nation must be roused; the propriety of the nation must be startled; the hypocrisy of the nation must be exposed; and its crimes against God and man must be proclaimed and denounced.

What, to the American slave, is your 4th of July? I answer; a day that reveals to him, more than. all other days in the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which lie is the constant victim. To him, your celebration is a sham; your boasted liberty, an unholy license; your national greatness, swelling vanity; your sounds of rejoicing are empty and heartless; your denunciations of tyrants, brass fronted impudence; your shouts of liberty and equality, hollow mockery; your prayers and hymns, your sermons and thanksgivings, with all your religious parade, and solemnity, are, to him, mere bombast, fraud, deception, impiety, and hypocrisy-a thin veil to cover up crimes which would disgrace a nation of savages. There is not a nation on the earth guilty of practices, more shocking and bloody, than are the people of these United States, at this very hour.

It’s a shame, as Douglass said, that he lacked any ability for “biting ridicule, blasting reproach, withering sarcasm, and stern rebuke.” Phew.

  • Spartacus

    That is an awesome speech. Fredrick Douglass, I salute you!

    Slavery still has not been banished from the Earth. Women are trafficked and forced into prostitution in Europe, children are sold into indentured servitude in Africa, illegal immigrants are exploited in America. The people of North Korea are slaves, in a way, without the freedom to chose their own destiny. There’s still a lot to be done.

    http://www.antislavery.org/english/

  • Lori

    I think Ta-Nehisi Coates’ post for today goes well with this one:

    http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2013/07/to-be-born-on-the-fourth-of-july/277537/

  • Lauren

    “Would you argue more, and denounce less, would you persuade more, and
    rebuke less, your cause would be much more likely to succeed. But, I
    submit, where all is plain there is nothing to be argued.”

    Tone policing: a time-honored American tradition since before 1852.

  • ReverendRef

    Women are trafficked and forced into prostitution in Europe

    And it’s not just Europe (just in case anyone thought Europe had a monopoly on sex slavery). I live in a town closely connected to I-5 (the major N/S highway on the west coast of the U.S. for non-U.S. readers), and it is not only a highway for goods and produce, but for sex trafficking as well.

  • damanoid

    “O! had I the ability, and could I reach the nation’s ear, I would,
    today, pour out a fiery stream of biting ridicule, blasting reproach,
    withering sarcasm, and stern rebuke.”

    Check it out, Frederick Douglass also predicted the internet.

  • Eric

    Great speech. Anyone else think that if Douglass had any ability for “biting ridicule, blasting reproach, withering sarcasm, and stern rebuke” he would have made Samuel L. Jackson look like Ned Flanders?

  • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

    A time-honored human tradition since forever, as far as I’ve been able to tell. And a no less shameful one for that.

  • Lorehead

    If I told someone from another continent, “And our underage sex slaves can’t even go to the authorities, because we have a law against being an underage sex slave,” they would ask, “That’s so the people in charge can keep their sex slaves, right?”

  • Cthulhu0818

    “And he has little patience for those who would appeal to “civility” in order to deny or to delay the only verdict the evidence allows”
    And today, we have one party that engages in the most vile, angry, and violent rhetoric possible, dragging the national discourse into the bilge, all the while stating they want kinder language, better discourse, and projecting their own actions onto everyone not themselves.
    We call them Republicans today. I’d dearly love to hear what Mr. Douglas would have had to say about them. I’ve already heard what they’d say about him.

  • Cthulhu0818

    He certainly illustrates why the GOP fears an educated citizen.


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