Remembering the Rwandan genocide through film

Today marks the 20th anniversary of the beginning of the Rwandan genocide.

About a decade later, we began to see a number of dramatic films that depicted that atrocity and its aftermath from a variety of angles. Some told the story from the perspective of the Rwandans themselves, while others focused on the various European and North American figures — journalists, priests, and soliders — who saw it happen.

I reviewed four of these films — and interviewed the producer of one of them — for BC Christian News and Christianity Today between 2004 and 2009. So to mark the anniversary, I have re-posted those articles here at the blog.

First, I reviewed Hotel Rwanda in 2004 for BC Christian News.

Then, I wrote a short review of Shooting Dogs for BC Christian News when it was released in Canada in 2006. I wrote a longer review of the film for Christianity Today when it was released in the United States — under a new title, Beyond the Gates — in 2007. I also interviewed producer David Belton at that time.

I reviewed the adaptation of Gen. Romeo Dallaire’s memoir Shake Hands with the Devil for BC Christian News in 2007.

And finally, I noted the arrival of Lee Isaac Chung’s Munyurangabo in a news item for Christianity Today when the film premiered at Cannes in 2007, and I wrote a short review of it for BC Christian News when it finally came to Vancouver in 2009.

About Peter T. Chattaway

Peter T. Chattaway was the regular film critic for BC Christian News from 1992 to 2011. In addition to his film column, which won multiple awards from the Evangelical Press Association, the Canadian Church Press and the Fellowship of Christian Newspapers, his news and opinion pieces have appeared in such publications as Books & Culture, Christianity Today, Bible Review and the Vancouver Sun. He also contributed essays to the books Re-Viewing The Passion: Mel Gibson’s Film and Its Critics (Palgrave Macmillan, 2004) and Scandalizing Jesus?: Kazantzakis’s The Last Temptation of Christ Fifty Years on (Continuum, 2005).


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