More advice on Republican voter outreach

Following the re-election of President Barack Obama, there’s no shortage of helpful advice for how Republicans can improve their appeal to women, youth, black, Latino and Asian-American voters.

• Republicans in Florida explain their outreach efforts toward minority voters.

• Republicans in Tennessee expand outreach efforts to attract women voters.

• Advice on Republican outreach to black and Hispanic voters from Tim Wildmon of the American Family Association.

• Advice on Republican outreach to Latino and Asian voters from reality show host Donald Trump.

• Advice on Republican outreach to Asian voters from conservative author Charles Murray.

• Advice on Republican outreach to Latino voters from Victor Davis Hanson of National Review.

• Advice on Republican outreach to black voters from Tea Party Nation head Judson Phillips.

  • AnonaMiss

    Fucking hell how are they so blind to their own assholery.

  • http://musings.northerngrove.com/ JarredH

    A bunch of white dudes giving advice on how to reach out to racial minorities, and not a  single one of them proposes the “radical” notion of actually listening to what racial minorities might want from them.

    It’d be downright funny if it wasn’t for the fact that not a single one of them actually sees how ridiculous what they’re doing actually is.

  • LL

    Hey, you forgot about Muslim voters. But don’t worry, Republicans haven’t. 

    I got an email forward from my mother just today about how Europe is now dominated by Islam and America is in danger of ending up the same way, if we don’t remember “9/11″ and how all Muslims really want to kill us all, so we have to support Jews and Israel so the Muslims don’t take over, or somesuch nonsense. 

  • JustoneK

    It’s the only way they maintain a semblance of sanity.

  • Carstonio

    At this point, I might be only mildly surprised if these folks thought they could attract black votes by publicly eating watermelon.

    Also, Tim Wildmon? Franklin Graham? Is promoting theocracy a family business?

  • Carstonio

    At this point, I might be only mildly surprised if these folks thought they could attract black votes by publicly eating watermelon.

    Also, Tim Wildmon? Franklin Graham? Is promoting theocracy a family business?

  • Carstonio

     What makes you think they’re actually trying to give advice? Or working on their outreach strategy? They sound, at best, like parents of rebellious teenagers lamenting “Where did we go wrong?” Like the clueless mom and dad in the Beatles’ “She’s Leaving Home,” or George Parker in Pleasantville unable to emotionally handle his wife’s  independence. White male hegemony has been rejected again at the polls, and these folks are really commiserating with each other by perpetuating their mutual denial.

  • http://musings.northerngrove.com/ JarredH

     I suspect you’re right.  But they’re at least playing at wanting to reach out, so I think it’s good to take them at their word, especially if the result is calling their bluff.

  • http://kingdomofsharks.com/ D Johnston

    Oh, Chuck Murray. As someone sagely pointed out in his comments, given that he’s found two groups that run against his paradigm (Asians and Jews), maybe he could consider that the paradigm is wrong.

    Also, maybe treating 40-some-odd percent of the world’s population as though they were clones of each other might not be such a great idea.

  • http://plantsarethestrangestpeople.blogspot.com/ mr_subjunctive

     It’d be downright funny if it wasn’t for the fact that not a single one
    of them actually sees how ridiculous what they’re doing actually is.

    Actually, it’s still funny.

  • http://dpolicar.livejournal.com/ Dave

     > I got an email forward from my mother just today about how Europe is now
    dominated by Islam [..] and how all Muslims really want to kill us
    all, so we have to support Jews and Israel…

    Yeah.
    I had exactly this conversation with my mom over Thanksgiving.
    It was sort of an interesting exchange, actually.

    “All of them?”
    “Yes!”
    “So, I’m trying to envision this. Like, are you saying they are all soldiers… that none of them have day jobs as plumbers and shopkeepers and garbagemen?”
    “Well, most of them are on welfare.”
    “Oh? How do social welfare programs work in, say, Iran?”
    “No, I mean the ones in America are on welfare!”
    “Ah, I see. So, Muslims living in Muslim countries, do they mostly have civilian jobs, or are they mostly soldiers?”
    “Well, I suppose some of them must have jobs, but that’s not really important.”
    “Oh? So, OK, what’s important?”
    “They don’t have families!”
    “Oh. Do you mean they don’t have husbands and wives and children like you do, or do you mean something different?”
    “They have wives, but they treat their wives badly, and they raise their children to hate us, and that’s all they do!”
    “You’re saying they may have families, but they don’t love their families?”
    “Yes, exactly! They don’t love their families. I don’t know any Muslims who are a normal, loving family!”
    “How many Muslim families do you know?”
    “None!”
    “Um. I see.”

  • http://musings.northerngrove.com/ JarredH

    Okay, you shared the conversation.  Please share the ibuprofen, too.

  • Jeff Weskamp

    Davis Hanson and Judson Phillips are simply reiterating the old John Birch line that they don’t dislike Blacks and Hispanics because of their skin color, but because they are two groups  of moochers living off of government benefits (which are paid for by all of America’s honest, hard-working white people).

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/ZNNUWEXUPQUQAYGBFDHTEIJBUI Joshua

     Racial minorities aren’t really supposed to “want” things. That’s kind of what they don’t like about some of us. The only people who are permitted to have expectations about the role of government, its use of its funds and powers, and the relationship between the state and the society in which it exists are white people. I’m not even sure if they realize that non-white people have individual political beliefs. They understand that white conservatives vote for conservatives and white liberals vote for liberals, but haven’t quite wrapped their head around why a black person would vote for a (white) liberal politician like John Kerry or why Asians (for example) would vote for a black liberal politician like Barack Obama.

    The article on Murray really captures this mindset really well. He seems to have no idea what Asians (as a group, which is probably not a very good classification, but whatever, or as individuals) really want. He comes up with a racial profile of them: “They’re hardworking, they’re entrepreneurial, they care for their families — not like “those people” over there. I like them, why don’t they like me?”

    If he were talking about a group of white voters, I believe he would have made more of an effort to find out what their actual beliefs are. Why did Asians as a whole favor President Obama so heavily (they went for him almost as much as blacks did)? What about his policies did they agree with? The kind of market research that political campaigns and corporations would do as a matter of course when looking at segmenting single moms or evangelicals or upper middle-class gay men living in urban areas  who work in the financial sector and enjoy reading Russian literature and working out at the gym just goes out the window in favor of the most tired, stale, worthless “Tiger Mom” / “Apu the Kwik-E-Mart man” stereotypes he could trot out.

    And you know what really sucks? I bet that buffoon Murray has a phD too, from a decent school that tried its best to teach him right for wrong and how to construct a logical argument with facts and evidence.

  • http://dpolicar.livejournal.com/ Dave

     Well, you’re welcome to my ibuprofen, but the Internet has its limitations as a delivery vehicle.

    When I ask someone for their reasons for a belief that they adopted for top-down reasons (e.g., as a tribal marker), I usually get confabulated bottom-up reasons.
    Which is headache-inducing in just this way. (Still more so on the Internet, where it’s usually accompanied by hostility, sarcasm, and a barrage of insults.)

    But every once in a while the confabulation runs out, and it’s possible to get an answer like “Well, I believe this because it’s what I hear people saying at parties, and I don’t really know all that much about the subject myself.” (Or whatever the actual reason is.)

    Which, by virtue of being honest, is a huge opportunity.

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    To be fair, that Tennessee one does not sound like a particular strategy or recommendation to the Republican party as a party.  It seems more like a bunch of individual institutions with all their feathers ruffled over something trivial, rather than a specific political plan.  

    Still ridiculous as all hell and indicative of certain religious-right indignation, but it does not sound like they are trying to pitch that to the Republican party.  Actually, the impression that I have gotten is that some of the serious Republican strategists are worried that the religious-right has outlived its own usefulness as a voting block, costing the Republicans more votes than they bring in.  

  • Vermic

    Once I found out Charles Murray co-authored The Bell Curve, I was like, “Oh, that asshole.  Say no more.”

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    That idea has always seemed alien to me.  

    I had Muslim classmates in middle and high school.  I see Muslim people on a daily basis when I walk through downtown.  I see affectionate Muslim families shopping together when I go to the grocery store.  For the most part the only thing that really identifies them is the modest clothing and the hijabs worn by the women.  Heck, I once saw a women in a full burqa buying merchandise at the San Diego Comic Con.  

    The point being that the observations I make every day refutes any claim that they are anything other than people like anyone else.  Anyone who thinks otherwise really does not get out enough.  

  • JustoneK

    It’s really about actively rejecting the reality they see.  All yer examples are clearly “outliers” and not realistic representations of Muslims in Murica, or the the rest of the world.

    If new evidence enters, even via first hand personal experience, that contradicts the important belief, it must be rejected.

  • frazer

    They should have an “ethnic rally” like Sen. George Allen (R-Clueless) did in 2006.  That’ll do it.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    He’s still alive? Damn. Herrnstein at least had the good grace to die after the Bell Curve, so he couldn’t be the target of oppobrium for that dreck.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Oh my God, please tell me that wasn’t a real thing. D:

    *faintly whispering “Ethnic rally?” to self in mixed horror and fascination*

  • EllieMurasaki

    The term ‘ethnic rally’ sounds to me like it could equally well apply to an African-American heritage festival and to Oktoberfest (which is of course a German heritage festival). As a concept it is not problematic in and of itself. Tangle it up with white supremacy (which I bet is what Sen. Allen did, though I don’t want to know badly enough to look it up) and
    that changes, but the trouble there is of course the white supremacy, not the ‘this is an important part of our identity, let’s get together a bunch of people with this identity and celebrate this part of ourselves’.

  • MikeJ

    Republican outreach:
    If you weren’t such a moron you would vote for me. Now how many hours of phone banking for me can I put you down for?

  • MaryKaye

    The other problem with “ethnic rally” is that it somewhat suggests that the speaker is dividing the world into “ethnic people” and “non-ethnic people” — which is offensive to everyone.  I am not a non-ethnic person; I have a cultural heritage of my own, mostly from the British Isles.  My husband is not “ethnic” but Japanese-American–very different from a Chinese-American person in terms of cultural heritage, to say nothing of an Indian person or a Native American.

    You aren’t going to sell me on a restaurant by telling me it serves ethnic food–I want to know whether it’s Indonesian or Japanese or Ethiopian.

    Seattle Center has been doing assorted festivals for many years now, but they do *specific* festivals:  a Hmong festival, a Mexican festival, a Japanese festival.  I agree that these are a fine thing.  The Day of the Dead procession at the Mexican festival was one of the more moving pieces of not-explicitly-Pagan ritual I’ve ever done.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ericrboersma Eric Boersma

    From that Right Wing Watch site: http://www.rightwingwatch.org/content/even-pat-robertson-denies-earth-years-old

    Pat Robertson denying YEC? That’s a pretty big deal.

  • http://twitter.com/mcclure111 mcc

    BTW, today Boehner announced the names for who’s chairing the 19 House committees this year. All are white. None are women.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Say! How about that revolution, hmm?

    Oh, called it off, have they? I guess trying to scare the USA into civil war over Obama’s election hasn’t worked. *breathes sigh of relief*

  • Consumer Unit 5012

     If new evidence enters, even via first hand personal experience, that contradicts the important belief, it must be rejected.

    That seems to be the Authoritarian approach to everything.  To quote that great philosopher Chico Marx, “Who are you gonna believe, me or your own eyes?”

  • http://www.facebook.com/jrandyowens Randy Owens

    I think the “ethnic rally” frazer was referring to wasn’t really an ethnic rally per se, but the suspiciously homogeneous crowd he was addressing when he noticed the Indian (South Asian) man filming it for his Democratic opponent, and called him out, addressing him as “macaca” (phonetic, I forget the proper spelling), which was later found to be a northern African French slang meaning literally “monkey”, like the macaques, but essentially, their equivalent of the n-word.  It probably cost him the election, which couldn’t have happened to a nicer guy.  Literally.

  • frazer

    Right.  Sen Allen’s “ethnic rally” was a tone-deaf attempt to deal with the firestorm caused by his use of the racial slur “Macaca” to refer to a person of East Indian heritage.  Amazingly, it didn’t work–he lost.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    He said WHAT? Dear God the cluelessness of some of these old white farts. DX

  • EllieMurasaki

    Doesn’t that quote go ‘your lying eyes’? It doesn’t make sense your way–people are accustomed to trusting their own senses, so a third party who wants to be believed over people’s own senses has to first convince them that their senses are not to be trusted.

  • http://www.facebook.com/jrandyowens Randy Owens

    I thought “lyin’ eyes” too, but that quote is usually attributed to Richard Pryor.  It could be there was an earlier similar Marx quote.

  • Mark Z.

    A neighbor came to borrow Nasrudin’s donkey. Nasrudin said “I would be happy to, but I’ve already lent him to someone else for the week.” At that moment they heard a donkey braying behind Nasrudin’s house.

    Nasrudin said, “Who do you believe, me or a donkey?”

  • Matri

    If new evidence enters, even via first hand personal experience, that contradicts the important belief, it must be rejected.

    So basically, creationism.

  • Loki100

    If they actually sat down and listened to minorities, they might have to actually change their platform to appeal to minorities. And they won’t ever do that.

    Hence why all the hand wringing among Republicans about Latinos over the election, they focused almost entirely on messaging and not on policy. Because Latinos are, apparently, too stupid to understand what policies benefit them and need to be advertised to like a consumer trying to decide between Coke or Pepsi. 

    In fact, before the election they came up with elaborate fantasy scenarios for why Latinos should vote Republican. Which basically played out that legal Latinos were profoundly resentful of illegal Latinos, and would vote to punish them, by voting Republican.

  • everstar

    It’s from Duck Soup, during one of the scenes where Chico and Harpo are running around dressed up as Groucho.  Margaret Dumont says to Chico, “I saw you [leave the room] with my own eyes!”  Chico answers, “Well, who you gonna believe, me or your own eyes?”

    The most remarkable thing about these scenes is how strong the family resemblance is when they’re all dressed up as Groucho.  It’s not so noticeable when they’re all themselves.

  • Katie

    Whenever I hear someone say “X group is socially conservative why aren’t they voting Republican” I hear “White people were dumb enough to vote against their economic interests because of bullshit ‘social issues’, why won’t Group X do the same thing.”

  • http://twitter.com/Didaktylos Paul Hantusch

    It doesn’t seem to have occurred to them that these days the contest in American politics is between conservatives and reactionaries.

  • Kit

     THIS. THIS. THIS. An old boss of mine was confused and offended that I didn’t support a female candidate for an office even though (he thought) I was female. Um, because I disagreed with her platform? I would love more women in higher offices and was able to vote for several this year, and I admit that I’m slightly happy even when I’m enraged that crazy/stupid/etc. women win/keep their seats (dammit Bachmann) so that half the population is more represented in the halls of power.

    Then I realized: he thinks that I w/should vote for women because they’re women because he votes for white men because they’re white men.

  • Kit

    Yep. They sure do want their Bobby Jindalls to speak for them so that they can pretend to be moving toward the center, but their actual outreach looks like this:

    “The nineteen new Republican House committee chairmen are all white males”

  • fraser

     Be fair. Hanson hates poor white people too. He upgraded them from merely people who don’t pay income tax to “tax avoiders” in a column earlier this year.

  • fraser

     I’ve read other Murray columns.His fondness for distinguishing between the Real Americans who live in wholesome Mayberry like towns and all the evil elites who can’t be real americans because they don’t love Nascar or work blue-collar jobs makes me think no, he doesn’t give a damn.

  • EllieMurasaki

    Because earning too little money to pay the bills is a tax-avoidance strategy pure and simple.

  • Alicia

    Please don’t call him “Sen. George Allen”. We worked hard to keep him out of Congress year.

  • WalterC

    Well, nepotism is a hell of a lot easier than trying to find a real job.

  • wendy

    Somebody needs to send him some binders. 

  • Alicia

    “Binders full of women” mostly makes sense in context, but when heard by itself, it sounds like something the detectives will find stashed in a suspect’s apartment on  an episode of Criminal Minds or Law and Order SVU.

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    Seattle Center has been doing assorted festivals for many years now, but they do *specific* festivals:  a Hmong festival, a Mexican festival, a Japanese festival.  I agree that these are a fine thing.  The Day of the Dead procession at the Mexican festival was one of the more moving pieces of not-explicitly-Pagan ritual I’ve ever done.

    I have been seeing those a lot, realizing how many of them the Seattle Center hosts.  Not that I pay special attention, but since I started taking classes in the Armory there several times a week, it is hard not to take notice of the many different displays showing up every other week or so.  

    It does make for interesting and informative lunch breaks.


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