David Barton, Louis L’Amour, and the Use of Historical Evidence

bendigo

NOTE:  A shorter version of this post appeared yesterday at The Way of Improvement Leads Home. The rumors are true.  David Barton’s story about children with guns in a 19th century classroom came directly from Bendigo Shafter, a Louis L’Amour novel. Readers of my blog The Way of Improvement Leads Home will recall a post [Read More...]

Sunday Night Odds and Ends

A few things online that caught my attention this week: Luther Spoehr reviews Robert Sullivan, My American Revolution: Crossing the Delaware and I-78. The C.V. Starr Center for the American Experience names a new deputy director. Virginia congressman wants to restore George Washington’s birthday as a national holiday. More on Dr. Ben Carson Alan Taylor [Read More...]

The United States: Christian or “Secular?”

Those who of you who thought I had gone off the deep end with last week’s critique of Dr. Ben Carson’s National Prayer Breakfast speech will probably be even more disturbed by the fact that today I will be speaking at an international conference on secularism.  (I explain my decision to accept the invitation to [Read More...]

Some Thoughts on Dr. Ben Carson’s Prayer Breakfast Speech

Political conservatives are singing the praises of Dr. Ben Carson’s speech last week at the National Prayer Breakfast.  Carson, a Johns Hopkins University pediatric surgeon and an evangelical Christian, used the speech to attack political correctness and Obamacare.  Oh, and did I mention that the President of the United States was seated a few feet [Read More...]

Sunday Night Odds and Ends

A few things online that caught my attention this week: Sean Wilentz reviews Oliver Stone and Peter Kuznick’s The Untold Story of the United States. The secret writing of American slaves John Turner on Henrietta Mears and evangelical women Joe Creech reviews David I. Smith and James K.A. Smith, ed. Teaching and Christian Practices: Reshaping [Read More...]

More on the History Black Evangelicalism in America

A couple of weeks ago I asked; “Where Are the Studies of Twentieth-Century Black Evangelicalism?”  I was working on an article on evangelical political engagement and wanted to say something about the role of Black evangelicals, but I was unable to find any good stuff on the subject. Thanks to the readers of The Anxious [Read More...]

Sunday Night Odds and Ends

A few things online that caught my attention this week: Andrew Sullivan on blogging Fifty-four inaugural addresses and American history From the college classroom to writing novels and teaching high school students Is Obama the “Reagan of the Left?”  And here. An 1864 antislavery children’s book Garry Wills on the South Rare color photos from [Read More...]

Where Are the Studies of Twentieth-Century Black Evangelicalism?

I am working on some revisions to an article on evangelicals and political engagement in the twentieth century.  If all goes well, the essay will find its way into a collection of essays stemming from a series of Catholic-Evangelical dialogues that have taken place over the last several years at Georgetown University.  One of the [Read More...]

Sunday Night Odds and Ends

A few things online that caught my attention this week: Conservatives debate the meaning of God and country.  Thomas Kidd reviews Linford Fisher, The Indian Great Awakening: Religion and the Shaping of Native Cultures in Early America. David Barton is at it yet again The “theological brew” of the Brethren in Christ Church Henry Louis [Read More...]

The Evangelical Impulse Behind the Abolition of Slavery

Did you get a chance to watch The Abolitionists last night on PBS?  If you missed it, you can watch the first episode  here.  The series focuses on five nineteenth-century abolitionists–Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Harriet Beecher Stowe, John Brown, and Angelina Grimke–and their fight to end slavery in America.  As I watched the show [Read More...]


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