Start Having Babies Young and Have Them After 40 Too?

Start Having Babies Young and Have Them After 40 Too? July 29, 2018

Nancy Campbell of Above Rubies seems to have changed much of the format of her Women’s Daily Encouragement from a four or so paragraph pondering on motherhood, gardening, home and other Quiverfull  topics. Now she shares one or two sentences. Or she shared the motherhood and birth stories of many of her followers.

Some of the stories parallel NLQ Founder Vyckie Garrison’s story of vasectomy reversal followed by militant fecundity. Others involve deciding to have more children after a pile of miscarriages. But the one thing most of them have in common is deciding to turn one’s womb into a Holy Pez dispenser of babies in the middle of financial struggles. Not the wisest of courses, but Nancy makes the claim that God will always pony up the dough if you make with the babies.

Here’s a tiny tidbit of one of the stories:

There’s nothing wrong with having a baby at 40, if you and your partner are in agreement and you do not have physical or financial limitations. Where the problem starts for me is when people like Nancy Campbell decide that EVERYONE must have a baby at 40. This is Quiverfull theology that damages so many, creates guilt, frustration and a host of problems.


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What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • Aloha

    This is the perfect article to read after seeing a few on our unprecedented heat wave and global warming. What better response to these problems than just to have more baby humans. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/660118b6606789478c7fb04951fe51af5143f9663ac9ea9386d1b6b5f444774c.png

  • SAO

    Since I hang out in circles with highly educated career women, I know lots of women who had, are trying for, or want a baby at 40. But remarkably few women with 2 or 3 kids want another at 40. If you do, go for it.

    That said, I can’t imagine one blog-commenter’s gushing will make a difference to whether women sign up for another few years of diaper-changing or 18 years of child-raising.

  • Martin Penwald

    Cattle is a concern too.

  • Mel

    I have several in my extended family. In the grandparents’ generation, the kid was a change-of-life baby 5 or more years after the “baby” of the family. Among my aunts, most of the women who had babies after 40 simply started having babies at 35 or 36 and had their third and last baby between 40-42. One woman had been told she and her husband were infertile and bad candidates for ART – and had surprise identical twins at age 40. (Apparently <<1% chance of conception + 15 years of sex without birth control worked out to one viable embryo that split itself…). One aunt has her 8th baby at 41 and her 9th baby at 46. (Surprise!)

    None of them would have decided to get pregnant thanks to reading Nancy Campbell.

  • otrame

    Not if they are handled properly. There is a TED talk on experiments to stop desertification, especially in places with wet and dry seasons. The guy, when a young man, had recommended culling the elephant herd in one place in African to stop the desertification (elephants on too little and are incredibly destructive of the landscape). When they’d slaughtered about 40k elephants across African and the desertification was worse, he vowed to find the answer, no matter what. His guilt drove him. He noted that in the areas of Africa where the big wild herds of wildebeests and similar animals were still roaming, there was no desertification even in areas that were dryer than the places that were turning into deserts. He studied that, and determined what would work. It does, in these days, require active management and cooperation among land owners, but it works.

    Ah, After a long post, I did find the citation after all. Let him explain it.https://www.ted.com/talks/allan_savory_how_to_green_the_world_s_deserts_and_reverse_climate_change/up-next

  • otrame

    Yeah, my dad was born after my grandmother had not had a period in almost two years before she got pregnant. She was 46 when he was born, and his youngest sibling was 9 years older. His older sisters were all adults. He had a nephew who was older by a year.

    My own granddaughter was born after her parents had been married 7 years and had given up on kids. As Mell says, low sperm count and time can, indeed produce a baby sometimes.

  • Zeldacat

    I know I’ve said it here before, but I had a great-uncle born years after the others when my great-grandmother was 46. I have no idea if she was still having periods or what (I suspect anybody who’d know is gone and whether they’d be willing to discuss that I have no idea, I’m all open about that stuff but then I’m Gen X) but he was a decade younger than the other 5 in the family. Quite the surprise.

  • katiehippie

    My grandma had her last (and 13th) kid the year she turned 50. I wish she was still alive to ask her about all that.