About Miles Mullin

Why I am (Still) An Evangelical

Here I offer my contribution to the Evangelical Channel’s Theme: Why I am (Still) Evangelical. In graduate school, I minored in theology.  During my time there, the theology department was unabashedly progressive–at least by evangelical standards.  Most students considered Jürgen Moltmann too conservative, and virtually no one had read Carl Henry.  In spite of this (or [Read More...]

The Problem of Personality-Driven Congregationalism in American Evangelicalism

As the American colonies congealed into a new nation, the founders undertook a “lively experiment.”*  The new nation refused to establish an official state church–or religion for that matter–allowing its citizens much greater freedom to determine their own religious affiliations than had been the case in Europe.  The young nation codified this commitment in the [Read More...]

Looking Back to Think Ahead: Baptists and Obergefell v. Hodges

A committed evangelical, today I write out of and to my narrower ecclesiastical tradition (Baptist) as I address the Supreme Court’s recent ruling.  All others are welcome to listen in or ignore me as they see fit.  The U.S. Supreme Court ruling last Friday (June 26, 2015) should surprise no one who has been paying attention.  In [Read More...]

Southern Baptists: Cooperative Autonomy?

20150614_195936 (1)

In my first outing as an official representative of Hannibal-LaGrange University, I have spent the past few days at the Greater Columbus (Ohio) Convention Center attending the Annual Meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention.  In the past, controversy stalked each meeting as Southern Baptists both fought internecine battles and made unpopular public proclamations addressing cultural [Read More...]

A Time of Commencement: Religious Liberty

William Raspberry By Knight Foundation (William Raspberry  Uploaded by Gobonobo) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

As the end of May approaches, most colleges and universities in the United States have already conferred degrees upon their graduates.  A long and arduous day punctuates the final exercises, which display the accomplishments of the graduates to their friends and families.  Part and parcel of that process is the commencement address, which few in [Read More...]

The Limits of Free Speech?

Salman Rushdie (By Kyle Cassidy via Wikimedia Commons)

The moment you limit free speech it’s not free speech. ~Salman Rushdie In the wake of the recent near attacks on the satirical cartoon contest sponsored by the American Defense Freedom Initiative self-appointed pundits have begun to talk about the “limits of free speech,” asking questions such as: is some speech so provocative that it should [Read More...]

Journal Full of Joy

Fides et Historia

Of the reading of journals, there is no end, and yet much reading of them is a weariness.   -Ecclesiastes 12:12, MAV* In every vocation, some tasks bring joy while others seem like… work.  For academics, keeping up with the latest scholarship in your field is a must.  And yet sometimes the task feels like impossible work. [Read More...]

Does Christian Liberal Arts Education Have a Future?

A month ago, the board of Sweet Briar College announced that the school, which has educated women in a single-sex environment for over 100 years, would close after the 2014-15 academic year.  The announcement by the school’s board sent waves through national news cycle.  The Diane Rehm Show, which is always a good measure of hot topic [Read More...]

American Religion in the 1950s

From the Archive.  Originally posted July 31, 2013. In American memory, the 1950s are often portrayed as a mundane, picturesque prelude to the chaotic, transformative decade that would follow.  Popular contemporary television portrayals of the decade such as The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet (1952-1966), Father Knows Best (1954-1960) and Leave It To Beaver (1957-1963) helped create the stereotype of the 1950s [Read More...]

Lone Star Religion

Rough Country - Wuthnow

Review of Robert Wuthnow, Rough Country: How Texas Became America’s Most Powerful Bible-Belt State (Princeton University Press, 2014). I grew up in Texas in the 1970s and 1980s. During my childhood, Texas was a purple state. Both major parties represented us in the Senate, and the governorship oscillated between Democrats and Republicans. Things have changed quite [Read More...]


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