Exodus: Gods and Kings: the Hebrew slaves speak!

exodus-empire-mosesjoshua-a-aThe October issue of Empire magazine is out, and with it, a new article looking at Ridley Scott’s Exodus: Gods and Kings. This time the primary interviewees are Aaron Paul and Ben Kingsley, who play the Hebrew slaves Joshua and his father Nun — and they reveal a bit more about the role that their characters play in the story, and in shaping the destiny of Moses.

The article also comes with new pictures, including the one to the right, which gives us our first good sense of what the Moses of the Exodus — as opposed to the Moses who is a prince of Egypt — will look like.

The key thing we learn from the article is how the characters Joshua and Nun become a part of Moses’ life in the first place.

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Exodus: Gods and Kings: new photos, some hints about Ramses’ mother, and the international release dates

exodus-ew-fall-1-aOh, look, it’s another picture of Christian Bale in blue armour surrounded by clashing armies.

Many of the images released so far for Exodus: Gods and Kings — see here, here, here and here — have revolved around an opening sequence in which Moses and Ramses are sent by the Pharaoh Seti to lead the Egyptian army into battle against the Hittites. That trend continues with a new photo that appears in Entertainment Weekly’s fall movie preview: once again — but from a new angle! — we see Moses wielding his bow and arrow as the battle rages around him.

The preview also gives us a new look at Sigourney Weaver’s Queen Tuya — and the accompanying write-up seems to drop a hint or two about the role that she will play within the film. Check ’em out below the jump.

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Moses holds a sword to Ramses’ throat and soldiers hold spears galore in new Exodus: Gods and Kings photos

At least fourteen photos and three posters were released this month during the run-up to the first trailer for Exodus: Gods and Kings. Now, thanks to a website called Pissed Off Geek, we have at least three more images for our collections.

The most striking, to me, is this shot of Moses holding a sword to Ramses’ throat, which was hinted at in the trailer but is much more explicit in this photo. And look at how much taller Moses is! I can’t think of another movie about the Exodus that made Moses so much more physically imposing, even threatening, than the Pharaoh he confronts. Even Charlton Heston, for all his statuesque poses, was content to proclaim things, point his fingers, and let God and his miracles take care of the rest. (And the Pharaoh opposing him was played by Yul Brynner, who was no slouch in the alpha-male department himself.)

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Will the crocodiles in Exodus: Gods and Kings be another nod to The Prince of Egypt?

It’s already clear from the trailer that Exodus: Gods and Kings will have at least one thing in common with The Prince of Egypt, namely its depiction of Moses and Ramses as good friends before the liberation of the Hebrew slaves tears them apart. Ridley Scott said two things in his recent interview with Empire magazine that got me wondering if his film might borrow another, much smaller element from that film.

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The Exodus: Gods and Kings trailer: a shot-by-shot analysis (lots and lots of horses, and a tip of the hat to Simple Minds)

The first trailer for Exodus: Gods and Kings is here — and it’s pretty much what you’d expect. Spectacular images (which will no doubt look even better in 3D), an enormous sense of scale, and hints of a brotherly love between Moses and Ramses that turns sour when Moses and his God turn against the Egyptians and their gods to liberate the Hebrew slaves. Oh, and horses. Lots and lots of horses. You can check it all out below the jump.

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Here we go again: Ridley Scott’s Exodus and “accuracy”

Longtime readers of this blog will know that I’m no fan of the expression “biblically accurate”. It’s not that I don’t like analyzing biblical and historical epics to see where they deviate from their source material; I do that sort of thing all the time. Rather, the problem is the way that phrase has been turned into a weapon, signifying little more than whether or not a movie has earned the approval of the person who uses that phrase.

Just in the past year and a half, we have seen people call The Bible and its big-screen spin-off Son of Godbiblically accurate” even though that miniseries was full of embellishments and got many details wrong, and we have also seen people condemn Noah for its alleged lack of accuracy even though it tackled lots of obscure biblical details that many people never think about. One film was “accurate” because it gave the audience what it wanted, and the other wasn’t because it didn’t.

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